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Burger King

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 4

    The Burger Wars have become the biggest food fight since that cafeteria scene from the movie Animal House. The two burger giants, McDonald's and Burger King, have each been cloning the other's top product in the bloody battle for the big burger buck. Burger King stepped up first with the Big King—Burger King's version of McDonald's Big Mac. Yes, it had two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun; although everything was arranged a bit differently, and there's no middle bun in there. Then McDonald's rolled out the Big 'N Tasty, which bore a striking resemblance to Burger King's Whopper, with fresh lettuce, tomato, and onion on top of a huge beef patty. Who's winning this fight by leveraging the popularity of the other company's product? Nobody, really. McDonald's chose to alter its Big 'N Tasty recipe by making it smaller 'n cheaper; then changed the name to BigXtra!, while Burger King limited the sale of the Big King and then took it off the menu. But this food fight is far from over. More recently Burger King tweaked its French fry formula in an unsuccessful attempt to steal away fans of McDonald's winning fried spuds recipe. And McDonald's has added more breakfast sandwiches to compete with Burger King's wide wake up selection. So the war continues. And the battlefield is splattered with ketchup.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    The burger wars are on. Burger King stepped up first with this competitor of the Big Mac. Yes, it has two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame seed bun—although everything's arranged a big differently, and there's no middle bun. The beef patties are also bigger than those found on a Big Mac. The other big difference? The Big King weighs in with 12 grams more fat than Mickey D's signature product, for a grand total of 43 grams. Here's a clone that re-creates the "secret" burger spread from scratch and includes super-lean ground beef. Add it all up and you've got a gram-zapping clone that comes in at around one-third the fat of the real thing.

    Nutrition Facts
    Serving size–1 sandwich
    Total servings–4
    Calories per serving–562 (Original–660)
    Fat per serving–15g (Original–43g)

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur. 

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 2

    This grilled chicken sandwich was introduced by America's number-two burger chain in 1990, and soon after the launch the BK Broiler was selling at a rate of over a million a day. Not good news for chickens.

    This one's easy to duplicate at home. To clone the shape of the chicken served at the burger giant, you'll slice the chicken breasts in half, and pound each piece flat with a mallet. Pounding things is fun. Let the chicken marinate and then fire up the grill. The recipe makes four sandwiches and can be easily doubled if necessary for a king-size munch fest.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    Here's a clone for a sandwich that America's number-two burger chain introduced in 1990, and soon after the launch was selling over a million a day. This was the same year that Burger King switched from animal fat to vegetable oil to cook the fried items. But, even though the BK Broiler includes flame-broiled chicken, rather than fried, it still comes with 29 grams. A big part of that comes from the mayonnaise. So, by replacing the regular mayonnaise with fat-free mayo and by not adding any additional fats, we can produce a sandwich that will taste like a BK Broiler, yet have less than one-quarter of the fat and fewer calories. 

    Nutritional Facts 
    Serving size–1 sandwich 
    Total servings–4 
    Calories per serving–335 (Original–550)
    Fat per serving–6g (Original–29g)

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 3.60. Votes: 5

    Get vertical with these two top secret breakfasts-in-sandwich from the world's number-two fast food chain. A great way to make the eggs for these breakfast sandwiches is to pour the beaten egg into a well-greased mold made from an empty pineapple can. Just cut both ends off an 8-ounce pineapple can—you know, the short cans that have the crushed or sliced pineapple inside. Then, before you know it, you'll be making perfectly round eggs like the fast food pros.  

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.83. Votes: 6

    Since McDonald's doesn't sell onion rings, these crunchy, golden hoops from the world's number two restaurant chain are the most popular onion rings in the world. There are more than 12,000 Burger Kings in 61 countries these days, and after French fries, onion rings are the second-most popular companion to the chain's signature Whopper sandwich. Check out how simple it is to clone a whopping four dozen onion rings from one onion, using this triple-breading process. When frying, trans fat-free vegetable shortening makes for the best clone, but you can get by fine using vegetable oil if that's the way you want to go. (For a great dipping sauce—similar to Outback's Bloomin' Onion sauce—check out my clone recipe for Burger King's Zesty Onion Ring Dipping Sauce.)

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    In January of 2011 Burger King introduced the fast food world’s first stuffed burger. Spicy bits of real jalapeno and little chunks of cheddar cheese are embedded in the quarter-pound beef patty which is flame-broiled and stacked on a corn-dusted bun with lettuce, tomato and an excellent spicy poblano sauce. Making the burger is no big secret: just chop up jalapenos and cheddar cheese and work them into the ground beef, then freeze the patties so that they hold their shape when grilled. The freezing will also prevent the cheese from melting too much. The real kicker in this recipe is the sauce. I had to design the formula to make much more than you will use on these 4 burgers because there needs to be enough volume for your food processor or blender to properly work its magic. If you have an extremely small food processor you can certainly cut the sauce recipe in half and there will be plenty for all your burgers. But then again, if you go with the whole recipe you’ll have extra sauce left over to spread on other sandwiches or to use as a dip for grilled artichokes.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Step-by-Step by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.43. Votes: 14

    In 1954, in Miami, Florida, James McLamore and David Edgerton built the first Burger King Restaurant. By 1991 more than 6,400 Burger King outlets could be found in forty countries and all fifty states. That gives this burger giant more than $6 billion is sales each year, making it the country's second-largest fast food chain. 

    For many, the favorite item on the menu is a flame-broiled hamburger conceived by the partners on a business trip from Orlando to Miami in 1957. Dubbed the "Whopper," this sandwich is overwhelmingly popular; figures show that Burger King sells more that 540 million annually, or nearly 2 million each day. And with more than 1,023 different combinations of the eight-or-so ingredients, including a vegetarian version, you really can "have it your way."

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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