The Original Copycat Recipes Website

P.F. Chang's

Products: 123 of 23
Show: 24
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Banana Spring Rolls

    The crispy banana spring rolls are just one delicious component of this signature dessert—it also comes with a big scoop of coconut-pineapple ice cream for an extraordinary flavor combo. The perfect mash-up of the warm spiced banana and the sweet tropical ice cream is why this is the number one dessert at the restaurant, and no other copycat recipe I’ve seen provides methods for you to make both parts at home.

    The bananas are wrapped in spring roll dough and fried, but first they are rolled in sugar and seasoned with Chinese five-spice, which is a blend of anise, star anise, cinnamon, cloves, and ginger that you can find in most big food stores.

    The ice cream hack is made by combining your favorite vanilla ice cream with toasted coconut bits, coconut extract, and real pineapple in a frozen bowl. Chains such as Cold Stone Creamery mix chunks into ice cream in a similar way­­—on a frozen slab of stone—so that the ice cream doesn’t melt while mixing.

    I’m also sharing with you an easy way to make the vanilla bean sauce from scratch, because there’s nothing better than fresh when it comes to vanilla sauce. For the caramel sauce, just pick your favorite from the many delicious bottled sauces available, and try to get one that comes in a squirt bottle so your dish looks great.

    Bring it all together, and you’ll have a beautiful hack of P.F. Chang's Banana Spring Rolls, with enough for four people to share.

    Click here for more amazing copycat recipes from P.F. Chang's.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Chicken in Soothing Lettuce Wraps (TV)

    While seeking out information to help make the ultimate hack of these lettuce wraps for my TV show Top Secret Recipe, I talked to Eric Justice, V.P. of Culinary Development at P.F. Chang's China Bistro who informed me that the restaurant uses a jet cooker stovetop with a high flame to cook food quickly. Jet cookers that blast out powerful 185,000 BTU flames can be found in restaurant supply stores, but I created a clone recipe requiring only the heat provided by most standard home stovetops (a gas flame stove is best).

    I also found out that a well-seasoned wok is preferable for this recipe, but it is also possible to produce a close re-creation of these famous lettuce wraps even without one. If you don't have a wok, use a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet and get it nice and hot. You'll also want to track down the right ingredients: black mushroom soy sauce contributes the dark caramel color to the lettuce wrap filling, and it's best to use Lee Kum Kee brand of hoisin sauce and oyster sauce just as the restaurant does. And finally, Shaoxing rice cooking wine, a secret I learned from Cecilia (Mama) Chiang.

    Heat up your wok (or large skillet) until it smokes and keep the ingredients moving around in the pan so that nothing scorches. This is the recipe that fooled all three judges in a blind taste test on my CMT show.

    Find more of my P.F.Chang's copycat recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Step-by-Step by Todd Wilbur. 

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Asian Pear Mojito

    You may be surprised not to find any pear ingredients in this drink. Rather, the flavors of lime juice, sour apple schnapps, citrus rum, and pineapple juice combine to create what P.F. Chang's bartenders claim is a refreshing pear-like flavor. Does it taste like pear to you? Regardless, the drink is excellent, especially if you dig mojitos.

    You might also like P.F. Chang's Key Lime Pie Martini copycat recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Key Lime Pie Martini

    This cocktail requires a vanilla-flavored Spanish liqueur called Licor 43. When it's mixed with key lime juice, sugar, and cream in just the right proportions, you get a remarkable liquid version of key lime pie. The restaurant uses bottled key lime juice which can be found at specialty stores such as Trader Joe's, or you can just squeeze your own key limes. In a pinch, you can use regular limes. And if you can't track down Licor 43, I found that Tuaca liqueur substitutes nicely. Cheers.

    You might also like P.F. Chang's Asian Pear Mojito copycat recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Kung Pao Brussels Sprouts

    Use my recipe for P.F. Chang’s incredible Kung Pao sauce and toss it with fried Brussels sprouts, peanuts, and Thai chilies and you get one of this Chinese bistro’s most popular new starters. And now, with this exclusive Top Secret Recipe, you'll have possibly one of your new favorite ways to serve Brussels sprouts. 

    You’ll get a half cup of the secret kung pao sauce—that will be enough to sauce 1 pound of Brussels sprouts in 2 separate batches.

    Oven baking, like other "hackers" recommend, will not give you the crispy texture of the original. These must be deep-fried. Even though you’ll be frying 8 ounces of Brussels sprouts at a time, you’ll want a wide-mouthed pan like a large saucepot, Dutch oven, or a deep fryer so that you don’t crowd the Brussels sprouts. Also, they will spatter for about 30 seconds when they first hit the oil, so a lid or a spatter guard will definitely come in handy.

    Once the oil is hot and the sauce is made, it takes just 5 minutes to get this delish dish on your table.      

    Have you decided on an entrée to serve with this? There are a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes here.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    P.F. Chang's Shrimp Dumplings

    Menu Description: "Served with a ginger chili pepper soy sauce. Steamed or pan-fried."

    Shrimp Dumplings from P. F. Chang's are scrumptious mounds of shrimp and other yummy ingredients wrapped in wonton wrappers and steamed. You can also order them pan-fried, which makes the bottom of each little package a nice crispy brown. The dumplings are served with a soy-based dipping sauce that can be cloned by combining six ingredients in a saucepan. You don't have to be concerned about the size of the shrimp you buy for this recipe, since you're going to puree the shrimp in a food processor. Oh, by the way, you'll need a food processor to puree the shrimp.

    I've hacked a ton of dishes from P.F. Chang's. Find your favorites here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.50 (votes: 2)
    P.F. Chang's Lemon Pepper Shrimp

    Menu Description: "Stir-fried with chives and bean sprouts."

    Chefs at P. F. Chang's China Bistro cook most dishes in heavy woks over extremely high heat with flames nipping at their noses. The special stove is designed so that the tall fires work at the back end of the wok, away from the chef. The well-ventilated stove is built with a steady stream of running water nearby to thin sauces and rinse the woks after each dish is prepared. Since we don't have those blaster stoves at home, I've had to tweak the recipe for standard kitchen equipment. A gas stove and a wok will give you the best results, but this recipe can be knocked-off just as well with a large saute pan, if that's all you've got. Things are moving fast in P.F. Chang's kitchens. The chefs are well-trained, but they eyeball measurements for sauces with a ladle, so each wok-prepared dish is going to come out a little different. Considering this, I figured the best way to get a good clone would be to order the dish several times. I averaged the flavors by combining several batches of sauce into one large bowl, and then copied that. The shrimp is lightly breaded—they use potato starch, but cornstarch is a good substitute—and flash fried in oil. Strain the shrimp out of the oil, add it back to the pan with the sauce, and you've got yourself a clone.

    I've copied a ton of famous dishes from P.F. Chang's. See if I hacked your favorite here

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 5)
    P.F. Chang's Mai Tai

    Menu Description: "It's our signature recipe."

    Bring the tropical spirit of this drink to your house with a clone of this potent cocktail from the growing Chinese bistro chain. Mai tai is Tahitian for "out of this world," and P.F. Chang's recipe is one of the best and most authentic. The secret to a true mai tai is found in the original recipe developed by Trader Vic in 1944: almond-flavored syrup, called "orgeat." You can find the sweet stuff in stores that sell coffee flavorings (Torani is one very popular brand), or from bar supply outlets. If you can't find orgeat, there's a clone recipe included in the Tidbits below.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.97 (votes: 33)
    P.F. Chang's Mongolian Beef

    Menu Description: "Quickly-cooked steak with scallions and garlic."

    Beef lovers go crazy over this one at the restaurant. Flank steak is cut into bite-sized chunks against the grain, then it's lightly dusted with potato starch (in our case we'll use cornstarch), flash-fried in oil, and doused with an amazing sweet soy garlic sauce. The beef comes out tender as can be, and the simple sauce sings to your taste buds. I designed this recipe to use a wok, but if you don't have one a saute pan will suffice (you may need to add more oil to the pan to cover the beef in the flash-frying step). P. F. Chang's secret sauce is what makes this dish so good, and it's versatile. If you don't dig beef, you can substitute with chicken. Or you can brush it on grilled salmon.

    I've cloned a lot of the best dishes from P.F. Chang's. Click here to see if I coped your favorite.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.63 (votes: 8)
    P.F. Chang's Garlic Snap Peas

    Menu Description: "Stir-fried with garlic."

    This is a standard side dish at the country's biggest Chinese dinner chain, and it'll take you just a couple of minutes to duplicate at home as a good veggie side for any meal, Chinese or otherwise. It's especially good when you're pressed to slam together a last minute vegetable for tonight's dinner. You can use a wok for this, but I always just use a medium-size sauté pan. The trick is to sauté the snap peas quickly over high heat, tossing often, until they're hot, yet still crispy and bright green. You get the garlic in right at the end, and then quickly pull the pan off the heat, so the garlic doesn't scorch. 

    Have you decided on an entrée? There's a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 4)
    P.F. Chang's Chang's Spare Ribs

    Menu Description: "Wok-seared with Chang's barbecue sauce."

    One of the most popular eats on P. F. Chang's appetizer menu is the Chinese spare ribs that arrive slathered with Asian-style barbecue sauce. The Asian flavor comes from the addition of sweet hoisin sauce to a fairly rudimentary barbecue sauce formula. Chang's menu says these ribs are spare ribs although they appear to be much smaller, more like baby backs. You can certainly use either for this recipe, just be sure to trim the ribs first, since the restaurant version is lean, clean ribs with no extra meat or fat hanging off. There are several ways to cook pork ribs—P. F. Chang's boils theirs first, then fries them. After that, the ribs are tossed with the sauce in wok and served piping hot. A serving of these ribs at the restaurant is 6 individual ribs, but since a full rack is as many as 12 ribs, this recipe will make twice what you get in a serving at the bustling bistro chain.

    Find more of your favorite P.F. Chang's dishes here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 3)
    P.F. Chang's Chocolate Torte

    Menu Description: "Served with vanilla bean and raspberry sauce."

    To produce these delicious flourless chocolate cakes P. F. Chang's contracts with local bakeries in each city where the Chinese bistros are located. The restaurants aren't built for baking, and this way the chain can ensure a fresh product every day. If you're a chocolate lover or you know one, this is the recipe to make. The torte is only 5 ingredients, and the versatile sauces create the perfect gourmet touch. Any leftover torte and sauce can be frozen, and thawed when a quick dessert is required.

     Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.75 (votes: 4)
    P.F. Chang's Orange Peel Chicken

    Menu Description: "Tossed with orange peel and chili peppers for a spicy/citrus combination."

    Several of P.F. Chang's top-selling items are similar in preparation technique: bite-size pieces of meat are lightly breaded and wok-seared in oil, then doused with a secret sauce mixture. This P.F. Chang's copycat recipe is made the same way. The heat in the citrusy sauce comes from chili garlic sauce, which you'll find in the aisle with the Asian foods in your supermarket—the rest of the sauce ingredients are common stuff. The orange peel is julienned into thin strips before adding it to the dish. Since the flavor from the peel is so strong, we won't need to add it until the end. Cook up some white or brown rice to serve alongside this dish and get the chopsticks ready

    What else are you craving from P.F. Chang's? See if I hacked your favorite dish here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 9)
    P.F. Chang's Chang's Spicy Chicken

    Menu Description: "Lightly-dusted, stir-fried in a sweet Szechwan sauce."

    The delicious sweet-and-spicy secret sauce is what makes this dish one of P. F. Chang's top picks. Once the sauce is finished all you have to do is saute your chicken and combine. You'll want to cook up some white or brown rice, like at the restaurant. If you can't find straight chili sauce for this recipe, the more common chili sauce with garlic in it will work just as well.

    Check out my other P.F. Chang's clone recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    P.F. Chang's Oolong Marinated Sea Bass

    Menu Description: "Broiled and served with sweet ginger soy, baby corn and spinach."

    Grab a couple half-pound sea bass fillets (not too thick), whip up a simple marinade and you're on your way to cloning one of the most beloved dishes at America's fastest growing Chinese bistro chain. The marinade is made with only six ingredients so you'll have that done in no time. If you can't find oolong tea, you can use green tea. Loose tea is best, but if you can only find bags, that's okay. One teabag contains 1 teaspoon of tea, so you'll just need half of a teabag for this recipe (in fact, the recipe still works even without the tea). 

    You will need to plan ahead for this P.F. Chang's Oolong marinated sea bass recipe, since the fish must marinate for 5 to 7 hours. Once the fish is marinated, fire up the oven to bake it, then finish it off under the broiler. Sauté some spinach, garlic, and tiny corn for an optional bed that makes the dish indistinguishable from the real thing.

    You'll find a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes over here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.42 (votes: 12)
    P.F. Chang's Dan Dan Noodles

    Menu Description: "Scallions, garlic and chili peppers stir-fried with ground chicken nesting on hot egg noodles. Garnished with shredded cucumber and bean sprouts."

    To clone P.F. Chang's take on this traditional Chinese noodle dish you should use a wok, but I found that a large saucepan works well too. Saute a couple of chicken breasts ahead of time and give them a chance to cool so you can finely mince them up. Get out the cleaver, if you've got one, and chop away. Or just use a big chef's knife. You can prepare the chicken ahead of time and keep it covered in the fridge until you're ready to make the dish. Once you've got the chicken hacked up, you'll have tasty noodles on the table in less than ten minutes.

    Find more of my P.F. Chang's copycat recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 4)
    P.F. Chang's Kung Pao Chicken

    Menu Description: “Quick-fired with peanuts, chili peppers and scallions. Our hot favorite.”

    My favorite chicken dish at P.F. Chang’s is also the top spicy chicken entrée at the 89-unit China bistro chain. The secret for a great clone is combining the right ingredients for the perfect marinade that will also become the sauce. Soy sauce and oyster sauce provide the saltiness. Mirin, which is sweetened sake, contributes the sweet flavor component. Chili oil gives the sauce its spicy kick and a little rice vinegar adds the necessary acidy. Sliced chicken breasts take a soak in this sauce for about an hour, then the chicken is dusted with a little cornstarch and flash-fried in peanut oil. You can use a wok for the frying stage and then rinse it out for use in the final sauté, or you can use a medium saucepan to fry the chicken and a sauté pan to finish cooking everything with the reserved sauce. Either way, you’ll get a great clone that goes perfect with a side of white or brown rice. Nailed the recipe, but still can't pick up peanuts with chopsticks.

    More cool P.F.Chang's copycat recipes here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 2.50 (votes: 2)
    P.F. Chang's Vegetarian Lettuce Wraps

    Menu Description: “Wok-seared tofu, red onions, water chestnuts with mint and lime. Served with cool lettuce cups.”

    After publishing the original version of my clone for this chain’s Chicken in Soothing Lettuce Wraps in 2006 I began receiving requests for a clone of the vegetarian version. I was hesitant to even try the vegetarian version thinking that it could not possibly be as delicious as the chicken version. Boy, was I wrong. The red onion, lime juice and mint set these lettuce wraps apart, and finely diced baked tofu replaces the chicken. Baked tofu has a dark exterior and is much firmer than regular tofu. If you can’t find it at your supermarket you can get it at Asian markets or in specialty stores such as Whole Foods. It comes in a variety of flavors like teriyaki and curry, but you want the unflavored stuff. Slice it by cutting it into thin slices, cut those slices in half lengthwise, and then cutting across those julienned slices so that you end up with very small diced pieces. Crank your stove up as high as it goes for this one.

    Find more clone recipes for your favorite P.F. Chang's fare here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    P.F. Chang's Spicy Green Beans

    Menu Description: "Stir-fried with Sichuan preserves, fiery chili sauce and garlic."

    Here's an easy side dish that you can start a day or two before you plan to serve it. Planning ahead like this will allow the spicy Sichuan mixture some time to pickle in the salt and acids. When you're ready to cook, a high-heat saute is put on the beans, and in less than five minutes you've got yourself an impressive, flavorful side that goes great with a slew of entrees—Asian-style or not.

    Try pairing my clone recipe for P.F. Chang's Kung Pao Chicken recipe with these spicy green beans. 

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    P.F. Chang's Chicken in Soothing Lettuce Wraps (Improved)

    Menu Description: "Quickly-cooked spiced chicken served with cool lettuce cups."

    While working on the formula for P.F. Chang's Vegetarian Lettuce Wraps, I discovered that there were several ways I could improve the clone recipe for the Chicken Wraps that I published in Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2. I've now perfected the flavor of the stir-fry with the addition of mirin (a sweetened sake syrup) and oyster sauce, both of which you can find in your market where the Asian foods are stocked. The "special sauce" that you spoon over your wraps has also been tweaked and perfected. And fnally, after reducing the amount of chicken from two breasts fillets to just one, I think this new and improved version of P.F. Chang's most popular dish is the absolute best clone it can be. 

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Buddha's Dream

    Even though bartenders are instructed to make this creamy drink without adding ice, go ahead and thicken yours up by adding a few cubes to the blender for more of a shake-like drink with the perfect richness level.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Heat Wave

    Go from zero to hero in seconds with this easy-to-make, and always refreshing, light rum drink.


    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Nutty Uncle Chang's Favorite

    You will thaw out a box of frozen strawberries, Grasshopper, to make this most delicious drink in a blender, with rums and juice and amaretto. Ah, yes, you have learned much, my son.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Kung Pao Brussels Sprouts

    Use my recipe for P.F. Chang’s incredible Kung Pao sauce and toss it with fried Brussels sprouts, peanuts, and Thai chilies and you get one of this Chinese bistro’s most popular new starters. And now, with this exclusive Top Secret Recipe, you'll have possibly one of your new favorite ways to serve Brussels sprouts. 

    You’ll get a half cup of the secret kung pao sauce—that will be enough to sauce 1 pound of Brussels sprouts in 2 separate batches.

    Oven baking, like other "hackers" recommend, will not give you the crispy texture of the original. These must be deep-fried. Even though you’ll be frying 8 ounces of Brussels sprouts at a time, you’ll want a wide-mouthed pan like a large saucepot, Dutch oven, or a deep fryer so that you don’t crowd the Brussels sprouts. Also, they will spatter for about 30 seconds when they first hit the oil, so a lid or a spatter guard will definitely come in handy.

    Once the oil is hot and the sauce is made, it takes just 5 minutes to get this delish dish on your table.      

    Have you decided on an entrée to serve with this? There are a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes here.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Banana Spring Rolls

    The crispy banana spring rolls are just one delicious component of this signature dessert—it also comes with a big scoop of coconut-pineapple ice cream for an extraordinary flavor combo. The perfect mash-up of the warm spiced banana and the sweet tropical ice cream is why this is the number one dessert at the restaurant, and no other copycat recipe I’ve seen provides methods for you to make both parts at home.

    The bananas are wrapped in spring roll dough and fried, but first they are rolled in sugar and seasoned with Chinese five-spice, which is a blend of anise, star anise, cinnamon, cloves, and ginger that you can find in most big food stores.

    The ice cream hack is made by combining your favorite vanilla ice cream with toasted coconut bits, coconut extract, and real pineapple in a frozen bowl. Chains such as Cold Stone Creamery mix chunks into ice cream in a similar way­­—on a frozen slab of stone—so that the ice cream doesn’t melt while mixing.

    I’m also sharing with you an easy way to make the vanilla bean sauce from scratch, because there’s nothing better than fresh when it comes to vanilla sauce. For the caramel sauce, just pick your favorite from the many delicious bottled sauces available, and try to get one that comes in a squirt bottle so your dish looks great.

    Bring it all together, and you’ll have a beautiful hack of P.F. Chang's Banana Spring Rolls, with enough for four people to share.

    Click here for more amazing copycat recipes from P.F. Chang's.

    Read more
  • Score: 2.50 (votes: 2)
    P.F. Chang's Vegetarian Lettuce Wraps

    Menu Description: “Wok-seared tofu, red onions, water chestnuts with mint and lime. Served with cool lettuce cups.”

    After publishing the original version of my clone for this chain’s Chicken in Soothing Lettuce Wraps in 2006 I began receiving requests for a clone of the vegetarian version. I was hesitant to even try the vegetarian version thinking that it could not possibly be as delicious as the chicken version. Boy, was I wrong. The red onion, lime juice and mint set these lettuce wraps apart, and finely diced baked tofu replaces the chicken. Baked tofu has a dark exterior and is much firmer than regular tofu. If you can’t find it at your supermarket you can get it at Asian markets or in specialty stores such as Whole Foods. It comes in a variety of flavors like teriyaki and curry, but you want the unflavored stuff. Slice it by cutting it into thin slices, cut those slices in half lengthwise, and then cutting across those julienned slices so that you end up with very small diced pieces. Crank your stove up as high as it goes for this one.

    Find more clone recipes for your favorite P.F. Chang's fare here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Key Lime Pie Martini

    This cocktail requires a vanilla-flavored Spanish liqueur called Licor 43. When it's mixed with key lime juice, sugar, and cream in just the right proportions, you get a remarkable liquid version of key lime pie. The restaurant uses bottled key lime juice which can be found at specialty stores such as Trader Joe's, or you can just squeeze your own key limes. In a pinch, you can use regular limes. And if you can't track down Licor 43, I found that Tuaca liqueur substitutes nicely. Cheers.

    You might also like P.F. Chang's Asian Pear Mojito copycat recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    P.F. Chang's Asian Pear Mojito

    You may be surprised not to find any pear ingredients in this drink. Rather, the flavors of lime juice, sour apple schnapps, citrus rum, and pineapple juice combine to create what P.F. Chang's bartenders claim is a refreshing pear-like flavor. Does it taste like pear to you? Regardless, the drink is excellent, especially if you dig mojitos.

    You might also like P.F. Chang's Key Lime Pie Martini copycat recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 4)
    P.F. Chang's Kung Pao Chicken

    Menu Description: “Quick-fired with peanuts, chili peppers and scallions. Our hot favorite.”

    My favorite chicken dish at P.F. Chang’s is also the top spicy chicken entrée at the 89-unit China bistro chain. The secret for a great clone is combining the right ingredients for the perfect marinade that will also become the sauce. Soy sauce and oyster sauce provide the saltiness. Mirin, which is sweetened sake, contributes the sweet flavor component. Chili oil gives the sauce its spicy kick and a little rice vinegar adds the necessary acidy. Sliced chicken breasts take a soak in this sauce for about an hour, then the chicken is dusted with a little cornstarch and flash-fried in peanut oil. You can use a wok for the frying stage and then rinse it out for use in the final sauté, or you can use a medium saucepan to fry the chicken and a sauté pan to finish cooking everything with the reserved sauce. Either way, you’ll get a great clone that goes perfect with a side of white or brown rice. Nailed the recipe, but still can't pick up peanuts with chopsticks.

    More cool P.F.Chang's copycat recipes here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.63 (votes: 8)
    P.F. Chang's Garlic Snap Peas

    Menu Description: "Stir-fried with garlic."

    This is a standard side dish at the country's biggest Chinese dinner chain, and it'll take you just a couple of minutes to duplicate at home as a good veggie side for any meal, Chinese or otherwise. It's especially good when you're pressed to slam together a last minute vegetable for tonight's dinner. You can use a wok for this, but I always just use a medium-size sauté pan. The trick is to sauté the snap peas quickly over high heat, tossing often, until they're hot, yet still crispy and bright green. You get the garlic in right at the end, and then quickly pull the pan off the heat, so the garlic doesn't scorch. 

    Have you decided on an entrée? There's a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 5)
    P.F. Chang's Mai Tai

    Menu Description: "It's our signature recipe."

    Bring the tropical spirit of this drink to your house with a clone of this potent cocktail from the growing Chinese bistro chain. Mai tai is Tahitian for "out of this world," and P.F. Chang's recipe is one of the best and most authentic. The secret to a true mai tai is found in the original recipe developed by Trader Vic in 1944: almond-flavored syrup, called "orgeat." You can find the sweet stuff in stores that sell coffee flavorings (Torani is one very popular brand), or from bar supply outlets. If you can't find orgeat, there's a clone recipe included in the Tidbits below.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 3)
    P.F. Chang's Chocolate Torte

    Menu Description: "Served with vanilla bean and raspberry sauce."

    To produce these delicious flourless chocolate cakes P. F. Chang's contracts with local bakeries in each city where the Chinese bistros are located. The restaurants aren't built for baking, and this way the chain can ensure a fresh product every day. If you're a chocolate lover or you know one, this is the recipe to make. The torte is only 5 ingredients, and the versatile sauces create the perfect gourmet touch. Any leftover torte and sauce can be frozen, and thawed when a quick dessert is required.

     Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    P.F. Chang's Oolong Marinated Sea Bass

    Menu Description: "Broiled and served with sweet ginger soy, baby corn and spinach."

    Grab a couple half-pound sea bass fillets (not too thick), whip up a simple marinade and you're on your way to cloning one of the most beloved dishes at America's fastest growing Chinese bistro chain. The marinade is made with only six ingredients so you'll have that done in no time. If you can't find oolong tea, you can use green tea. Loose tea is best, but if you can only find bags, that's okay. One teabag contains 1 teaspoon of tea, so you'll just need half of a teabag for this recipe (in fact, the recipe still works even without the tea). 

    You will need to plan ahead for this P.F. Chang's Oolong marinated sea bass recipe, since the fish must marinate for 5 to 7 hours. Once the fish is marinated, fire up the oven to bake it, then finish it off under the broiler. Sauté some spinach, garlic, and tiny corn for an optional bed that makes the dish indistinguishable from the real thing.

    You'll find a lot more P.F. Chang's copycat recipes over here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    P.F. Chang's Spicy Green Beans

    Menu Description: "Stir-fried with Sichuan preserves, fiery chili sauce and garlic."

    Here's an easy side dish that you can start a day or two before you plan to serve it. Planning ahead like this will allow the spicy Sichuan mixture some time to pickle in the salt and acids. When you're ready to cook, a high-heat saute is put on the beans, and in less than five minutes you've got yourself an impressive, flavorful side that goes great with a slew of entrees—Asian-style or not.

    Try pairing my clone recipe for P.F. Chang's Kung Pao Chicken recipe with these spicy green beans. 

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    P.F. Chang's Shrimp Dumplings

    Menu Description: "Served with a ginger chili pepper soy sauce. Steamed or pan-fried."

    Shrimp Dumplings from P. F. Chang's are scrumptious mounds of shrimp and other yummy ingredients wrapped in wonton wrappers and steamed. You can also order them pan-fried, which makes the bottom of each little package a nice crispy brown. The dumplings are served with a soy-based dipping sauce that can be cloned by combining six ingredients in a saucepan. You don't have to be concerned about the size of the shrimp you buy for this recipe, since you're going to puree the shrimp in a food processor. Oh, by the way, you'll need a food processor to puree the shrimp.

    I've hacked a ton of dishes from P.F. Chang's. Find your favorites here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.75 (votes: 4)
    P.F. Chang's Orange Peel Chicken

    Menu Description: "Tossed with orange peel and chili peppers for a spicy/citrus combination."

    Several of P.F. Chang's top-selling items are similar in preparation technique: bite-size pieces of meat are lightly breaded and wok-seared in oil, then doused with a secret sauce mixture. This P.F. Chang's copycat recipe is made the same way. The heat in the citrusy sauce comes from chili garlic sauce, which you'll find in the aisle with the Asian foods in your supermarket—the rest of the sauce ingredients are common stuff. The orange peel is julienned into thin strips before adding it to the dish. Since the flavor from the peel is so strong, we won't need to add it until the end. Cook up some white or brown rice to serve alongside this dish and get the chopsticks ready

    What else are you craving from P.F. Chang's? See if I hacked your favorite dish here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 4)
    P.F. Chang's Chang's Spare Ribs

    Menu Description: "Wok-seared with Chang's barbecue sauce."

    One of the most popular eats on P. F. Chang's appetizer menu is the Chinese spare ribs that arrive slathered with Asian-style barbecue sauce. The Asian flavor comes from the addition of sweet hoisin sauce to a fairly rudimentary barbecue sauce formula. Chang's menu says these ribs are spare ribs although they appear to be much smaller, more like baby backs. You can certainly use either for this recipe, just be sure to trim the ribs first, since the restaurant version is lean, clean ribs with no extra meat or fat hanging off. There are several ways to cook pork ribs—P. F. Chang's boils theirs first, then fries them. After that, the ribs are tossed with the sauce in wok and served piping hot. A serving of these ribs at the restaurant is 6 individual ribs, but since a full rack is as many as 12 ribs, this recipe will make twice what you get in a serving at the bustling bistro chain.

    Find more of your favorite P.F. Chang's dishes here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.42 (votes: 12)
    P.F. Chang's Dan Dan Noodles

    Menu Description: "Scallions, garlic and chili peppers stir-fried with ground chicken nesting on hot egg noodles. Garnished with shredded cucumber and bean sprouts."

    To clone P.F. Chang's take on this traditional Chinese noodle dish you should use a wok, but I found that a large saucepan works well too. Saute a couple of chicken breasts ahead of time and give them a chance to cool so you can finely mince them up. Get out the cleaver, if you've got one, and chop away. Or just use a big chef's knife. You can prepare the chicken ahead of time and keep it covered in the fridge until you're ready to make the dish. Once you've got the chicken hacked up, you'll have tasty noodles on the table in less than ten minutes.

    Find more of my P.F. Chang's copycat recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
Never miss a secret
Subscribe to Todd Wilbur’s newsletter and the first to know what’s free and what’s new!
I'm Todd Wilbur, Chronic Food Hacker

For 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

What's Hot