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Stuart Anderson's Black Angus

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 3

    Before there was Lone Star, Outback, or Ruth's Chris, a real rancher named Stuart Anderson was serving up huge cuts of delicious prime beef in his Seattle-based restaurant chain. The first Black Angus restaurant opened on April Fool's Day in 1964 and quickly became known for its huge, juicy cuts of prime rib.

    Early on, Stuart Anderson's Black Angus served a signature bread dubbed "Ranch Bread" free with each meal. Around five years ago that evolved into Cheesy Garlic Bread, which is no longer free, but it is still a delicious and often requested side for any meal. Try to find a large loaf of French or Italian bread for this recipe. The recipe works with just about any type of bread loaf, but to make it more like the original, bigger is better.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Menu Description: "A huge, savory 16 oz. bone-in U.S.D.A choice steak prepared with a smoky marinade and fire-grilled. Smothered with sauteed mushrooms, roasted red peppers and real smoked bacon."

    "Come in for dinner and I'll do the dishes," Stuart Anderson used to promise in television ads. Stuart had a down-home appeal that worked wonders for his chain. Stuart was a rancher who raised a small number of cattle, Clydesdales, and sheep for many years, and was known for his casual, laid-back approach to just about everything. When he opened the first restaurant he built it on a "ranch-to-restaurant" philosophy, meaning that he could supply the fresh beef from his own small ranch, or at least imply that was the case. But as the dinner house's popularity exploded over the years, larger suppliers had to help supply the beef to the growing chain. Still, the fable lived on, and it worked very well for the restaurant. Even with more than one hundred stores in the chain, customers continued to believe they were getting home-grown steaks picked by Stuart himself.

    Now you can hand pick your own T-bone steaks when you make this hack recipe for steak in a smoky marinade that clones the Stuart Anderson's Black Angus favorite. The recipe here is for T-bone steaks, but you can use the marinade and topping on any cut of beef. If you can, plan on marinating the steaks overnight for the best flavor.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Menu Description: "U.S.D.A. choice top sirloin, fire-grilled to your liking then doused with a whiskey pepper sauce."

    When the number of Black Angus restaurants had reached 117 by the early eighties, the Marriott Corporation bought the chain from owner Stuart Anderson. These days Stuart relaxes at his home on Whidby Island off the coast of Washington State, and spends his winters at his home in warm Palm Springs, California.

    Here is an easy recipe for sirloin pepper steak with a tasty whiskey sauce inspired by the popular dish served at Black Angus. Black Angus chefs were no doubt inspired by the classic French dish steak au poivre in which the meat is covered with coarsely ground black pepperbefore being sauteed or broiled. Brandy or cognac is used  in the restaurant to get the steak flaming for an flashy presentation.

    You won't be required to set your steak on fire in this version. Though you will find that flavorful sauce goes well with other cuts of steak besides the top sirloin called for here.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes by Todd Wilbur.