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Soup Nazi's

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    Score: 2.75. Votes: 12

    New Yorkers would line up around the block at the 55th Street location to get a hot cup of Al Yeganeh's delicious soup at Soup Kitchen International. And everyone was familiar with the demands posted near the order window: "Pick the soup you want!" "Have your money ready!" and "Move to the extreme left after ordering!" Violate any of these rules and Al sent you to the back of the line, even if you had waited for as long as two hours to get to the front. This is precisely how Yeganeh was portrayed by actor Larry Thomas in Seinfeld episode number 115, when he forever became known as "The Soup Nazi." After that episode aired a new rule was posted: "Do not mention the N Word (Nazi)!" In 2006 the original location closed and Al went into the business of franchising his concept under the new name "The Original Soup Man." Today there are more than 50 franchises throughout the U.S. and Canada, including six in Manhattan. But the recipes are still a secret, even from franchisees, since the soups are delivered premade to each location in 8-pound bags. Among the favorites to this day is the crab bisque, which is the soup Jerry orders on the show.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.10. Votes: 21

    After the "Soup Nazi" episode of Seinfeld aired, Jerry Seinfeld and several members of his production crew went over to Soup Kitchen International in New York City for lunch. When owner Al Yegenah recognized Jerry he flew into a profanity-filled rant about how the show had "ruined" his business and he demanded an apology. According to writer Spike Feresten, Jerry gave "the most insincere, sarcastic apology ever given," Yegenah yelled, "No soup for you!" and immediately ejected them from the premises. Knowing that to upset Al was to risk being yelled at and possibly evicted like Jerry, it was with great caution that I approached the order window to ask the Soup Nazi a few questions about the November 1995 Seinfeld episode that made him famous. Needless to say, the interview was very brief.

    TW: How do you feel about all the publicity that followed the Seinfeld episode?
    AY: I didn't need it. I was known well enough before that. I don't need it.

    TW: But it must have been good for business, right?
    AY: He [Seinfeld] used me. He used me. I didn't use him, he used me.

    TW: How many people do you serve in a day?
    AY: I cannot talk to you. If I talk I cannot work.

    TW: How many different soups do you serve?
    AY: (Getting very upset) I cannot talk! (Pointing to sign) Move to the left! Next!

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.59. Votes: 29

    Elaine: "Do you need anything?"
    Kramer: "Oh, a hot bowl of Mulligatawny would hit the spot."
    Elaine: "Mulligatawny?"
    Kramer: "Yeah, it's an Indian soup. Simmered to perfection by one of the great soup artisans in the modern era."
    Elaine: "Oh. Who, the Soup Nazi?"
    Kramer: "He's not a Nazi. He just happens to be a little eccentric. You know, most geniuses are."

    Kramer was right. Al Yeganeh—otherwise known as The Soup Nazi from the Seinfeld episode that aired in 1995—is a master at the soup kettle. His popular soup creations have inspired many inferior copycats in the Big Apple, including The Soup Nutsy, which was only ten blocks away from Al's original location on 55th Street. Yeganeh's mastery shows when he combines unusual ingredients to create unique and delicious flavors in his much-raved-about soups. In this one, you might be surprised to discover pistachios and cashews among the many vegetables. It's a combination that works.

    I took a trip to New York and tasted about a dozen of the Soup Nazi's original creations. This one, the Indian Mulligatawny, was high on my list of favorites. After each daily trip to Soup Nazi headquarters (Soup Kitchen International), I immediately headed back to the hotel and poured samples of the soups into labeled, sealed containers, which were then chilled for the trip back home. Back in the lab, portions of the soup were rinsed through a sieve so that ingredients could be identified. I recreated four of Al's best-selling soups after that trip, including this one, which will need to simmer for 3 to 4 hours, or until the soup reduces. The soup will darken as the flavors intensify, the potatoes will begin to fall apart to thicken the soup, and the nuts will soften. If you follow these directions, you should end up with a clone that would fool even Cosmo Kramer himself.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.59. Votes: 51

    In Zagat's 1995 New York City Restaurant Survey, Le Cirque 2000, one of the city's most upscale restaurants, received a 25 rating out of a possible 30. In the same guide, Al "The Soup Nazi" Yeganeh's Soup Kitchen International scored an impressive 27. That put the Soup Nazi's eatery in 14th place among the city's best restaurants for that year.

    It was common to see lines stretching around the corner and down the block as hungry patrons waited for their cup of one of five daily hot soup selections. Most of the selections changed every day, but of the three days that I was there, the Mexican Chicken Chili was always on the menu. The first two days it was sold out before I got to the front of the line. But on the last day I got lucky: "One extra-large Mexican Chicken Chili, please." Hand over money, move to the extreme left. 

    Here is a hack for what has become one of the Soup Nazi's most popular culinary masterpieces. If you like, you can substitute turkey breast for the chicken to make turkey chili, which was the soup George Costanza ordered on the show.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

    Update 1/9/17: Replace the 10 cups of water with 8 cups of chicken broth for a shorter simmer time and better flavor. I also like using El Pato tomato sauce (recipe calls for 1/2 cup) for a bit more heat.