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Snapple

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    In 1972, brothers-in-law Leonard Marsh and Hyman Golden had become tired of running a window-washing business. They contacted their friend Arnold Greenberg and told him they wanted to start selling bottle fruit juices. Greenberg had a health-food store and thought their idea for all-natural beverages was a good one, so together they started selling pure fruit juices under the name Unadulterated Food Products. It took the trio about a decade to acquire the name they really wanted, Snapple, for $500 from a guy in Texas who has used it on an apple soda that bombed. Snapple's big break came in 1988, when the company started bottling ready-to-drink iced teas. It took only five years for Snapple to become the leader in the iced tea market, blowing away giants Lipton and Nestea. The Snapple iced tea phenomenon helped the company increase sales between 1988 and 1992 by nearly 1,300 percent.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.65. Votes: 17

    Here's a quick and easy recipe for the brand of ice tea that blew away competitors Lipton and Nestea. Between 1988 and 1992 Snapple tea sales increased a whopping 1,300 percent. If you're a big Snapple ice tea drinker, this recipe will save you some cash. A 16-ounce bottle of Snapple tea costs around $1.50, but the same amount using this top secret hack will only cost you 15 cents to make. Here now is the improved version of the recipe that first appeared in More Top Secret Recipes.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    Snapple was selling juices for five years, since 1982, before the fruity line of teas was rolled out. Just five years after that, Snapple was selling more tea in the U.S. than Lipton or Nestea. Today, even though Snapple sells over 50 different bottle beverages, the iced teas are still the most successful products in the line. But not all the fruity flavors of tea were hits. Cranberry, strawberry, and orange are now extinct, so those flavors can only be enjoyed by making versions of your own at home with these simple formulas.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.50. Votes: 8

    In 1995 when I cloned Snapple iced teas in More Top Secret Recipes, I picked several varieties of the tea and used either concentrated juices or extracts for the fruity essence. Since that time, Snapple was sold to Quaker and the less popular flavors were retired to the land of the dead foods. But a clone for one of the most popular flavors of ice tea eluded me back then, since there was no common extract or juice concentrate to turn to for that flavor. Bummer too, since Snapple's raspberry iced tea is a top seller. Today, thanks to the popularity of flavored coffee drinks, flavored syrups can be found in supermarkets. The most common brand is Torani. Get some of the raspberry flavor and you can clone this secret recipe for a fraction of the cost of the real thing.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.