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Pogen's Gingersnaps copycat recipe by Todd Wilbur

Pogen's Gingersnaps

Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
Reviews: 2
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Back in the 1870s, in the coastal city of Malmo, Sweden, a man named Anders Pahlsson baked the first of his soon-to-be famous gingersnaps in a bakery he named Pogen's. In 1970 Pogen's, Inc., opened in the United States, expanding the line of baked goods that Pahlsson developed in the nineteenth century.

A legend that dates back many years says that if you place a gingersnap in the palm of your hand, press down in the middle, and it breaks into three pieces, good luck will follow. Today, more than 100 years later, good luck and hard work have made Pogen's the third-largest supplier of cookies to the growing vending business.

Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

Update 1/26/17: Bump up the ginger flavor a little by adding another 1/2 teaspoon of ground ginger to the recipe. Also, reduce the cinnamon, so that it doesn't dominate, by 1/2 teaspoon.

Get This

_main
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
  • 1/2 cup vegetable shortening
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 1/4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon powdered ginger
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
Do This

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Use an electric mixer to cream together the butter, shortening, brown sugar, molasses, and egg in a large bowl until light and fluffy.

3. Sift together the dry ingredients in another bowl, then combine both mixtures.

4. Form the dough into walnut-size balls. With floured fingers, press the balls into flat circles on an ungreased cookie sheet.

5. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until golden brown.

6. Remove the gingersnaps from the cookie sheet as soon as they are cool and seal in a covered container to preserve their crunch.

Makes 4 dozen.

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Reviews
karen
Dec 10, 2014, 22:00
These were truly the best gingersnaps I've eaten. Perfect amount of spice, and makes alot! I'll make this recipe again and again!
Maxine
Oct 23, 2014, 22:00
These are the best ginger snaps ever, and they were shaped like gingerbread boys. Really good with cantaloupe too.

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I'm Todd Wilbur, Chronic Food Hacker

For 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

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