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Nestle Crunch

Nestle Crunch

Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
Reviews: 1
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In 1867, infant mortality rates in Vevey, Switzerland, had been climbing and Henri Nestle was working hard on a concoction of concentrated milk, sugar, and cereal for babies who were refusing their mother's milk. Eventually he discovered a formula that helped infants stay strong and healthy. He called his new product Farine Lactee and merged with two American brothers, Charles and George Page, who came to Switzerland to capitalize on Swiss canned milk technology. Their new company was called Nestle and Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company, and quickly expanded into fifteen other countries. Seven years later, Nestle sold the company to three local businessmen for one million francs.

The new company kept the Nestle name and started selling chocolate in 1904. In 1929, the company acquired Cailler, the first company to mass-produce chocolate bars, and Swiss General, the company credited with inventing milk chocolate. This company was the core of the chocolate business as we know it today. The Nestle Crunch bar was introduced in 1928 and is now the company's top-selling candy bar.

Update 10/27/20: For chocolate that sets better, temper the chocolate by melting 2/3 of the chips (16 ounces) in a glass bowl over a saucepan of simmering water. Be sure not to get any water in the chocolate or it will seize up. Gently stir occasionally.  When the chips are melted and smooth, remove the bowl from the hot water and place it on a bunched up dish towel. Add the remaining 8 ounces of chips and stir vigorously until they are melted. If you are having a tough time getting the chips to melt all the way, you can place the bowl over the simmering water again, but just for a couple seconds, then remove the bowl and stir again. You may also want to line your 9×13-inch pan with parchment paper, or make a sling so that the candy can be easily removed. 

Think of all the famous candy you can make at home? Click here to see if I hacked your favorites.

Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

Get This

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  • Two 12-ounce bags milk chocolate chips (Nestle is best)
  • 1 1/2 cups Rice Krispies
Do This

1. There are two ways to melt the chocolate. The best way: Temper it (see instructions above in the intro); or the easy way: Melt the chocolate chips in a microwave safe bowl in a microwave set on medium for 2 minutes. Stir halfway through the heating time. Melt thoroughly, but be careful not to overheat.

2. Gently mix the Rice Krispies into the chocolate and pour into a greased 9x13-inch pan.

3. Slam the pan on the counter or floor to level the chocolate.

4. Refrigerate until firm about 30 minutes.

5. Cut the candy in half widthwise and then cut it twice lengthwise, making 6 bars.

Makes 6 "king-size" bars

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Reviews
Dana
Apr 13, 2015, 22:00
It is simple and it is yum. I made it with dark chocolate. Unbelievably good. The only thing I would change is I would put the warm chocolate on parchment paper. It stuck to my greased pan. I had to put the pan in warm water to loosen it to remove it.

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I'm Todd Wilbur, Chronic Food Hacker

For over 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

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