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Kraft Miracle Whip

By Todd Wilbur


Score: 4.38. Votes: 16
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Even though this stuff looks like mayonnaise, Food and Drug Administration dudes say it has to be called "dressing." Miracle Whip was invented in 1933 as a sweeter, more flavorful alternative to mayonnaise, but it contains a few extra ingredients that the FDA says aren't supposed to be in mayonnaise, such as sugar, paprika, and garlic powder. If you're a fan of Kraft's variation on the creamy white mother sauce, you must try this clone. As with homemade mayonnaise, you make a simple emulsion with egg yolk and oil. Add in the other ingredients and you've got yourself a Miracle Whip kitchen copy that's way fresher than any bottle on store shelves. 

Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • 1 egg yolk
  • 5 teaspoons white vinegar
  • 4 teaspoons granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
  • Pinch paprika
  • Pinch garlic powder
  • Do This
    • Restaurant/Brand
      Kraft
    • Instructions

      1. Whisk the egg yolk by hand for 15 seconds.

      2. Combine the vinegar, sugar, salt, and lemon juice in a small bowl or glass measuring cup. Stir until the salt and sugar are dissolved. Add half of this solution to the egg yolk and whisk for another 15 seconds.

      3. Pour the canola oil into a plastic squirt bottle or measuring cup with a spout. This will allow you to drizzle the oil into the egg yolk with one hand while whisking with the other. Dribble a few drops of oil into the yolk and whisk, and continue to add oil a little bit at a time while whisking non-stop. When you are about halfway through the oil, your mayonnaise should be very thick. Whisk in the remaining vinegar solution and add the mustard, paprika, and garlic powder. Now you can add the remaining oil in a steady stream while whisking until all of the oil has been added.

      4. Put the dressing into an old mayonnaise jar and seal it with a lid. Keep up to 7 to 10 days in your refrigerator.

      Makes 1 cup.

      Tidbits: If you are concerned about the raw egg yolk used in this recipe (even though the risk of salmonella poisoning from well-chilled fresh eggs is extremely low), you can buy eggs that have been heat-treated (pasteurized) for a bit more scratch. The vinegar used in the recipe also helps to kill any stray bacteria baddies.

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Score: 4.38. Votes: 16
Rating of votes (16)
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Courtney
May 15, 2016, 22:00

This is great. I've wanted to try making my own mayonnaise for a long time. I needed some and I was out so I gave this a try. I made a couple of substitutions because of what I had on hand. I used grape seed oil, regular jar mustard, and garlic juice instead of the counterparts listed. It turned out pretty good. I'm done buying it at the store now. I might try doing it a little differently in the future but for now I'm very pleased.

Phil
May 10, 2016, 22:00

If you ended up with a bitter taste, you used rancid oil. That's the only ingredient in this that could cause it. (I learned this myself). Try it again with fresh oil