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Kelloggs Eggo Waffles

By Todd Wilbur


Score: 4.15. Votes: 20
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On November 18, 2009 Kellogg Co. reported a nationwide shortage of its popular Eggo frozen waffles because of interruptions at two of the four plants that make them. Historic amounts of rain closed a plant in Atlanta, and production lines at the bakery in Rossville, Tennessee were closed indefinitely for repairs. A company spokesperson claims that it would take until the summer of 2010 before shelves across the country were re-stocked at pre-shutdown levels. I hadn't cloned Eggo Waffles, but once I heard this news I immediately got to work. Fortunately, I was able to snag some of the last few boxes of several varieties of Eggos at a local Albertson's supermarket, and after a few hours in the lab I pounded out a brand-new clone recipe for everyone who is missing their Eggos. This recipe creates undercooked waffles—the homestyle version plus three other varieties, see Tidbits–that you'll be able to keep in your freezer until you get your Eggo craving. When it's time to make the waffles, drop your home-cloned version into a toaster just as you would the original Eggos. Depending on the size of your waffle iron, you may have to break or cut the waffles in half to get them to fit all the way into your toaster. Be sure to switch your toaster to its lowest setting before popping them in, and in just a couple minutes you'll be saying, "Leggo my cloned Eggo."

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Basic Recipe (Homestyle)
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 1/8 teaspoons salt
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 8 drops yellow food coloring
  • Do This
    • Restaurant/Brand
      Kellogg's
    • Instructions

      1. Heat up a waffle iron.

      2. Combine flour with baking powder and salt in a large bowl.

      3. In a separate medium bowl, combine the eggs and sugar with an electric mixer for 1 minute on high speed. Add the milk, water, buttermilk, and oil and mix until combined.

      4. Pour the wet mixture into the dry stuff. Add the food coloring, and mix on medium speed for about 30 seconds.

      5. Spray the waffle iron with non-stick cooking spray. Pour 1/2 cup of batter onto the waffle iron and close. Cook for 1 minute, then carefully remove the waffle and cool. Waffle should not have browned. Repeat with remaining waffle batter.

      6. When the waffles are cool, seal them up in freezer bags and freeze.

      7. When preparing waffles to eat, cook as with the original: in a toaster on the lowest setting until browned. You may have to break or cut waffles in half so that they fit all the way into your toaster.
       
      Makes 8 to 9 waffles.
       
      Tidbits: Here are the minor adjustments you can make to the above recipe to create clones of three other Eggo waffle varities:

      For Buttermilk Waffles

      Use 1/2 cup milk, 3/4 cup buttermilk, and 3/4 cup water.
       
      For Blueberry Waffles
      Add 3/4 cup dried and chopped blueberries to the basic recipe batter. Stir in blueberries after combining wet ingredients with dry ingredients.
       
      For Whole Wheat Waffles
      Use 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour and 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour. Also, increase the water to 3/4 cup.

Reviews
Average rating:

Score: 4.15. Votes: 20
Rating of votes (20)
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2 customers
 
Tammyy
Mar 4, 2018, 06:15

Slumber party kids that normally only eat frozen waffles loved these, even the picky eaters loved them. They ate every one that I made. Made a second batch to freeze and the next couple of days popped one or two in the toaster for breakfast and my daughter and I still loved them. Great make ahead breakfast, just toast and go like those from the store. This recipe is a keeper for our family.

Benjamin Peikes
Jan 1, 2018, 05:45

This might be the worst waffle recipe I've made. Seems like the measurements are off. The batter is way too thick, and the waffles come out chewy. I made sure not to over mix the batter, but I think using an electric mixer is a bad idea. None of the other recipes for waffles call for electric mixing.

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