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Hooters Buffalo Chicken Wings Reduced-Fat copycat recipe by Todd Wilbur

Hooters Buffalo Chicken Wings Reduced-Fat

Score: 3.20 (votes: 10)
Reviews: 10
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You probably don't need me to tell you that traditional chicken wings have significant fat and calories. In most cases, the wings are deep-fried in hot oil, the skin is left on the chicken, and then they are smothered in a spicy sauce that is usually around half butter. Good stuff for sure, but sometimes you might want to take a break from the fat. So then, how can we reduce the fat in a clone recipe for what has become one of the most popular chicken wings around without compromising the flavor and everything else that makes the Hooters version so great?

First of all, we must broil and bake them instead of using the traditional frying method. As the wings broil we keep the skin on so that the meat won't dry out. Once the wings have cooled a little, we take off the skin and replace it with a seasoned breading and a light coating of cooking spray. We bake the wings until they're golden brown, smother them with a spicy wing sauce that's made with a light butter-flavored spread rather than butter, and, voila—a Hooters Buffalo Chicken Wing clone that weighs in at around one-third the fat of the original version. 

Nutrition Facts:
Serving size–5 pieces
Total servings–2
Calories per serving–210 (Original–471)
Fat per serving–10g (Original–30g)

Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur.

Get This

_main
  • 10 chicken wings with skin
  • 1/4 cup Crystal Louisiana hot sauce or Frank's Red Hot cayenne sauce
  • 1/4 cup light buttery spread (such as Smart Balance)
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 cup milk
  • canola oil non-stick spray
Do This

1. Preheat the oven on broil.

2. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Spray the foil with a generous amount of nonstick oil spray . You can also use non-stick foil.

3. Arrange the chicken wings on the foil with the side that has the most skin on it facing up. Broil the wings for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the skin begins to brown and dry.

4. Remove the wings from the oven, and set it to 450 degrees F. Allow the wings to cool for 10 minutes or just long enough so that they can be touched.

5. While the wings cool, prepare the sauce by combining the hot sauce and light spread in a small saucepan over medium/low heat. Heat the mixture, stirring often, until it begins to boil. Immediately remove the sauce from the heat and cover the saucepan until the chicken wings are ready to coat.

6. Prepare the chicken breading by combining the flour with the salt, paprika, and cayenne pepper in a small bowl. Pour the milk into another small bowl.

7. When the wings are cool enough to touch, remove the skin from each of the chicken pieces, and discard it. Dip the wings, one at a time, in the breading, then into the milk and back in the breading, so that each wing is well coated.

8. Place the wings back on the baking sheet. Spray a coating of nonstick oil spray over each wing, so that the breading is moistened, and then bake the wings at 450 degrees F for 10 to 12 minutes. Crank the oven up to broil for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the wings begin to brown and become crispy.

9. Remove the wings from the oven. Let them rest for about a minute, then put them into a plastic container (with a lid). Pour a generous amount of the sauce over the wings, cover, and gently stir or toss the wings so that they are all well coated with the sauce. Serve immediately.
 
Serves 2 as an appetizer.
 
Tidbits: For the best results use just the drumette part of the wings. These pieces have more meat on them and are also less likely to stick to the foil as they bake.

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Reviews
anne brownell
Dec 6, 2005, 22:00
I took these wings to a tailgating football game and they were gone in 30 minutes. Everyone enjoyed them.
NL
Sep 14, 2005, 22:00
Far too much work to make. They taste great though.

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For over 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

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