The copycat recipes you really love probably came from here.

Dairy Queen

Items: 15 of 5, per page
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to your cart
  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 4

    When the United States was emerging from the Great Depression in 1938, J.F. McCullough was experimenting with the idea of creating a new frozen dairy product. McCullough felt ice cream tasted better when it was soft and dispensed fresh from the freezder, not frozen solid. To test his theory with the public, McCulllough held and "All-the-Ice-Cream-You-Can-Eat-for-Only-10-Cents" sale at a friend's ice cream store. More than 1,600 people were served the soft ice cream in the course of two hours. Convinced that the new product was a big hit, McCullough had to find a machine that could dispense the product at the right consistency. It wasn't long before he found Harry Oltz, the inventory of a freezer that could do the job. In 1940 McCullough opened the first Dairy Queen in Joliet, Illinois.

    As of 1991 the company claimed to have more than 5,300 retail stores in the United States and twelve other countries. Since its creation in 1985, the Blizzard has shot to the top as the most popular Dairy Queen product, with more than 200 million of the treats sold each year. This is my version of the treat with Heath candy bar bits in it.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    It’s Dairy Queen’s most successful product ever. Over 175 million Blizzards were sold in the year following the product’s debut in 1985. The new creation was such a sales phenomenon that other fast food chains created their own soft-serve ice cream treats with mixed in chunks of cookies and candies and fruit. McDonald’s McFlurry is one popular example. Today there are over a dozen varieties of Blizzards to choose from at Dairy Queen. 

    The biggest challenge when making Blizzard replicas at home is keeping the ice cream from getting soft when the other ingredients are stirred in. To solve that problem, we’ll use a special technique inspired by marble slab ice cream stores. Servers mix your choice of chunky ingredients with your choice of ice cream on a slab of frozen stone. This method keeps the ice cream cold and firm while mixing, until it’s served to a drooling you.

    To incorporate this technique at home you need to put a glass or ceramic bowl in the freezer for at least 30 minutes (while you’re at it you may also want to freeze the glass you’re going to serve the thing in). An hour or more is even better. We mix our ingredients in the icy bowl, while the ice cream stays frosty cold. Just be sure to use plain vanilla ice cream (not French vanilla), if you have a choice.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    It’s Dairy Queen’s most successful product ever. Over 175 million Blizzards were sold in the year following the product’s debut in 1985. The new creation was such a sales phenomenon that other fast food chains created their own soft-serve ice cream treats with mixed in chunks of cookies and candies and fruit. McDonald’s McFlurry is one popular example. Today there are over a dozen varieties of Blizzards to choose from at Dairy Queen. 

    The biggest challenge when making Blizzard replicas at home is keeping the ice cream from getting soft when the other ingredients are stirred in. To solve that problem, we’ll use a special technique inspired by marble slab ice cream stores. Servers mix your choice of chunky ingredients with your choice of ice cream on a slab of frozen stone. This method keeps the ice cream cold and firm while mixing, until it’s served to a drooling you.

    To incorporate this technique at home you need to put a glass or ceramic bowl in the freezer for at least 30 minutes (while you’re at it you may also want to freeze the glass you’re going to serve the thing in). An hour or more is even better. We mix our ingredients in the icy bowl, while the ice cream stays frosty cold. Just be sure to use plain vanilla ice cream (not French vanilla), if you have a choice.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    It’s Dairy Queen’s most successful product ever. Over 175 million Blizzards were sold in the year following the product’s debut in 1985. The new creation was such a sales phenomenon that other fast food chains created their own soft-serve ice cream treats with mixed in chunks of cookies and candies and fruit. McDonald’s McFlurry is one popular example. Today there are over a dozen varieties of Blizzards to choose from at Dairy Queen. 

    The biggest challenge when making Blizzard replicas at home is keeping the ice cream from getting soft when the other ingredients are stirred in. To solve that problem, we’ll use a special technique inspired by marble slab ice cream stores. Servers there mix your choice of chunky ingredients with your choice of ice cream on a slab of frozen stone. This method keeps the ice cream cold and firm while mixing, until it’s served to a drooling you.

    To incorporate this technique at home you need to put a glass or ceramic bowl in the freezer for at least 30 minutes (while you’re at it you may also want to freeze the glass you’re going to serve the thing in). An hour or more is even better. We mix our ingredients in the icy bowl, while the ice cream stays frosty cold. Just be sure to use plain vanilla ice cream (not French vanilla), if you have a choice.

    The dough for this recipe comes from a tube of Pillsbury cookie dough. It's simple and really good.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 8

    Here's what happens behind the counter when you order a Cappuccino MooLatte frozen coffee drink at Dairy Queen: a plastic cup is filled almost halfway with the frozen simple syrup mix that comes out of the machine used for slush drinks. Next, your server hops over to the frozen soft serve machine and fills the cup the rest of the way with ice cream. After a couple squirts of concentrated coffee syrup, the drink is blended on a milkshake machine and is then passed off to you in exchange for a few greenbacks. Since we don't have the same efficient commercial equipment they use at Dairy Queen we must make our clone in a household blender. First things first, we need to start with very strong coffee. Make some espresso, or pick some up at your nearest coffee house. After dissolving sugar in the coffee, chill it, and then add it to ice cream, ice, and milk in a blender, and get it going. When the blender does its work, you'll have two 16-ounce clones of the DQ frozen coffee drink fave ready for whipped cream. If you prefer the mocha or caramel variety of the MooLatte, scroll to the bottom where the Tidbits will throw those variations your way.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.