THE ORIGINAL COPYCAT RECIPES WEBSITE

Drinks

Good job! You just found recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to easily duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home for less money than eating out. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make! See if Todd has hacked your favorite drinks here. New recipes added every week.

Items: 3140 of 136, per page
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to <a href="?target=cart">your cart</a>
  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.60. Votes: 5

    Celebrate life with clones for two of Friday's delicious new martinis: the super tasty Pomegranate Martini features Pama, the first pomegranate liqueur, and the Candy Apple Martini that tastes like a liquid caramel apple—really good stuff. As with any properly prepared martini, be sure to chill each glass by filling it with ice before making the drink, and shake everything up with much fury and enthusiasm before pouring.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.80. Votes: 10

    Menu Description: "Sutter Home White Zinfandel with DeKuyper Luscious Peachtree schnapps, pineapple juice and lemon-lime soda. Served Mucho size over ice with fresh fruit." 

    No need to waste expensive wine duplicating this incredibly refreshing new cocktail from Applebee's. Sutter Home White Zinfandel, which runs around 5 bucks a bottle, is the brand of choice at the chain, but feel free to use any white zinfandel on the shelf, even if it's in a box. The wine will be diluted with peach schnapps and other ingredients, so no matter which wine you pick, you'll always get a delicious, thirst-quenching cocktail that's perfect for warm weather hang time.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.00. Votes: 2

    Mai Tai creator and restaurateur Victor Bergeron well-documented his original secret formula: His recipe from 1944 is a delicious blend of 17-year-old rum, lime juice, orange curacao, simple syrup and orgeat for a subtle flavoring of almond. When Vic's Tahitian friends sipped his new creation, they said "Mai Tai Roa Ae"—Tahitian for "out of this world, the best." So Vic named his drink "Mai Tai," and the rest is cocktail history.

    The recipe has changed throughout the years using younger rums and various fruit and citrus juice measurements—you can find these other versions of the Mai Tai posted around the Internet. There is even a Trader Vic's Mai Tai mixer available in some stores. But nowhere will you find a formula for the "World Famous" $9.50 caramel-colored cocktail currently served at the 30 Trader Vic's restaurants that dot the globe. Why not? Because the secret ingredient in the current recipe is a concentrated syrup that is only available for commercial use at the restaurant chain. And that's the first formula we need to duplicate to get the exact flavors of the restaurant version into our home clone. I secured some of this "secret" concentrated mix, and figured out how to clone it using a super-sweet simple syrup solution plus orange and almond extracts. That's the first step. After that, add lime juice, lemon juice and dark rum, plus the syrup to a glass full of crushed ice; apply the proper garnishes; and you will have recreated two refreshing servings of one of the world's most famous cocktails.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 3

    You don't need rum to make a great mojito—just check out this variation on one of the most popular cocktails of the new millennium. Where white rum is usually found in this drink, America's largest casual Mexican food chain mixes in silver tequila and Cointreau orange liqueur. Add to that a little sweet-and-sour mix and a squirt of agave syrup and you have a tasty mash-up of margarita and mojito. Agave syrup is used as a sugar substitute, and it can be found in many markets now, or in specialty and health food stores. The same brand of agave syrup On the Border uses in this drink (Wholesome) can be found at Whole Foods.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 3 by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    The Margarita Presidente is Chili's fancy designer libation made from Sauza Conmemorativo, Cointreau, and Presidente brandy. It's served up in a salt-rimmed martini glass along with additional servings in a shaker on the side. The drink comes highly recommended by the dozens of placards and signs dangling from rafters overhead in Chili's bar. I do concur.

    This clone recipe should fill your glass around three times, and your head with many happy thoughts.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    This cocktail requires a homemade mai tai mix which should tell you from the start that it's going to be good. Of course you can go the lazy route and use a pre-made mixer, like the one made by Mr. & Mrs. T. But I've got to say, there's nothing like the smooth, fruity taste that comes from the homemade fresh stuff. If you want to serve your guests a masterful mai tai, take the time to really make it rock.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 4

    Here's a great twist on the traditional margarita. Sour apple schnapps and apple juice join forces with tequila and sweet-and-sour mix in a martini glass that's rimmed with cinnamon sugar. Hey, it's like drinking apple pie! This recipe makes one drink, but it's easy to double up. That's a good thing, since it seems like one is never enough.

    Source: Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2 by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.75. Votes: 4

    In 1919, when Roy Allen and Frank Wright started selling their new root beer beverage to a thirsty America, national Prohibition was taking its grip on the country. Their timing couldn't have been better. No longer able to legally drink real beer, thirsty patriots had to settle for this sweet, foamy concoction derived from roots, herbs, and berries. Roy and Frank had thirteen years of Prohibition to make their mark and their fortune from this refreshing drink. By 1933, when Prohibition came to a screeching halt, Roy and Frank had 171 stands in various shapes and sizes, each with the familiar A&W logo on them, all across the country. These drive-up stands with their tray boys and tray girls bringing cold drinks out to the cars were an inspiration for many other roadside stands and diners, and the prelude to the popular fast food drive-thrus of today. You can still get a foamy mug of A&W root beer at outlets across the country, or just enjoy some from a 12-ounce can.

    But if it's some home cloning you'd like to get into, check out this A&W root beer recipe that was first printed in More Top Secret Recipes. The beauty is you won't have to worry about collecting roots, herbs, and berries like the pros do when making A&W root beer. Instead you just need to get some root beer extract, manufactured by McCormick, that you'll find near the vanilla in your local supermarket. Make up some root beer syrup, let it cool off in the fridge, and you can whip up 10 servings by combining the syrup with soda water whenever you're ready to drink.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits and Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    Sure, Roy Allen and Frank Wright are better known for the exquisite root beer concoction sold first from California drive-up stands under the A & amp;W brand name. But these days the company makes a darn good vanilla cream soda as well. And the formula is one we can easily clone at home by combining a few simple ingredients. Most of the flavor comes from vanilla, but you'll also need a little lemonade flavor Kool-Aid unsweetened drink mix powder. This mix comes in .23-ounce packets and provides the essential citric acid that gives this A&W cream soda copycat recipe the slight sour flavor of the real thing. Once you make the syrup, let it cool down in the fridge, then combine the syrup with cold soda water in a 1-to-4 ration, add a little ice, and get sipping.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits and Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    Now you can make a home clone for this refreshing citrus beverage in no time at all. Just add lemon and lime juice to a syrup solution, along with a little Kool-Aid lemonade drink mix for that special tang thanks to included citric acid, and you're almost there. When the syrup has cooled, mix it into some cold soda water in a 1 to 4 ratio. That's it. You've just made this clone of 7-UP yours.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits and Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

Items: 3140 of 136, per page
What's Hot
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to <a href="?target=cart">your cart</a>