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Drinks

Good job! You just found recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to easily duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home for less money than eating out. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make! See if Todd has hacked your favorite drinks here. New recipes added every week.

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    When Irv Robbins was discharged from the army in 1945, he hooked up with his brother-in-law Burt Baskin and the two opened an ice cream parlor in Glendale, California. A simple coin flip determined whose name would go first on the sign. By 1948 six Baskin-Robbins stores had opened their doors and the concept of franchising in the ice cream industry was born.

    You may want to let the strawberries thaw out a bit so that you can chop up the strawberries and get a more accurate measure. The word on the street is that some of those frozen whole strawberries can be quite big. Chopping them up first also helps you get a smoother blend going.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    It was in 1953 that the now-famous “31 Flavors” sign was introduced, burdening customers with the dilemma of having to decide which of so many great ice cream flavors they would choose. The number 31 was picked to suggest that a new flavor could be selected every day of the month. The company has come up with around one thousand flavors so far. And as with their most famous flavor, Rocky Road, many other original Baskin-Robbins flavor creations would be often imitated—among them Pralines and Cream and Jamoca Almond Fudge. For this great smoothie, you may want to chop up those frozen strawberries (especially the big ‘uns) to make measuring easier and more accurate.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Baskin-Robbins has become known for creating flavors representing the events of the day. When the Brooklyn Dodgers moved to Los Angeles, the chain introduced “Baseball Nut.” When James Bond films were popular in the 60s, the chain rolled out “0031 Secret Bonded Flavor.” When the TV show Laugh-In became a big hit, the company created “Here Comes the Fudge”. And when Americans landed on the moon, Baskin-Robbins celebrated with “Lunar Cheesecake."

    This smoothie clone uses raspberry sherbet along with the vanilla frozen yogurt. It’s the most complex of Baskin-Robbins smoothie selections, but worth every bit of extra effort.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Check out the menu board at any Starbucks and you’ll find this frozen drink described as a blend of raspberry and other fruit juices plus Starbucks’ own Tazo brand tea. We’ve discovered that those other fruit juices include white grape juice, aroniaberry, cranberry, and blackberry. Since aroniaberry juice is next to impossible to track down in a local supermarket, we’ll have to make a taste-alike drink with a combination of just the other; more important flavors. Grab the raspberry syrup and a jar of seedless blackberry jam made by Knott’s Berry Farm, and brew up a little tea. Starbucks used Tazo black tea for the drink, but you can use the more common Lipton tea bags. You will only use 1/3 cup of the tea for this 1-serving recipe, so you’ll have plenty left over for additional servings, or for a quick iced tea fix.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Soda and citrus flavors were combined in 1938 to create a grapefruit-lemon soft drink that would later inspire Coke to make Fresca. Fresca was popular when it was introduced in the 60s since it was artificially sweetened and contained no calories. That was back when diet drinks were just catching on. Nowadays just about every soda comes in a diet version, and Fresca sales have slipped, despite a tweaking of the formula in the early 90s.

    Squirt continues to hold on to a loyal cult following, with many who claim the soda is the only true cure for a hangover. To clone it, just add real bottled white grapefruit juice, along with a little Kool-aid mix for a lemony zing, to the simple syrup recipe. Chill the syrup and soda water until cold and get ready to make a dozen cups worth of citrus soda at home.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    It’s Dairy Queen’s most successful product ever. Over 175 million Blizzards were sold in the year following the product’s debut in 1985. The new creation was such a sales phenomenon that other fast food chains created their own soft-serve ice cream treats with mixed in chunks of cookies and candies and fruit. McDonald’s McFlurry is one popular example. Today there are over a dozen varieties of Blizzards to choose from at Dairy Queen. 

    The biggest challenge when making Blizzard replicas at home is keeping the ice cream from getting soft when the other ingredients are stirred in. To solve that problem, we’ll use a special technique inspired by marble slab ice cream stores. Servers mix your choice of chunky ingredients with your choice of ice cream on a slab of frozen stone. This method keeps the ice cream cold and firm while mixing, until it’s served to a drooling you.

    To incorporate this technique at home you need to put a glass or ceramic bowl in the freezer for at least 30 minutes (while you’re at it you may also want to freeze the glass you’re going to serve the thing in). An hour or more is even better. We mix our ingredients in the icy bowl, while the ice cream stays frosty cold. Just be sure to use plain vanilla ice cream (not French vanilla), if you have a choice.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    It’s Dairy Queen’s most successful product ever. Over 175 million Blizzards were sold in the year following the product’s debut in 1985. The new creation was such a sales phenomenon that other fast food chains created their own soft-serve ice cream treats with mixed in chunks of cookies and candies and fruit. McDonald’s McFlurry is one popular example. Today there are over a dozen varieties of Blizzards to choose from at Dairy Queen. 

    The biggest challenge when making Blizzard replicas at home is keeping the ice cream from getting soft when the other ingredients are stirred in. To solve that problem, we’ll use a special technique inspired by marble slab ice cream stores. Servers mix your choice of chunky ingredients with your choice of ice cream on a slab of frozen stone. This method keeps the ice cream cold and firm while mixing, until it’s served to a drooling you.

    To incorporate this technique at home you need to put a glass or ceramic bowl in the freezer for at least 30 minutes (while you’re at it you may also want to freeze the glass you’re going to serve the thing in). An hour or more is even better. We mix our ingredients in the icy bowl, while the ice cream stays frosty cold. Just be sure to use plain vanilla ice cream (not French vanilla), if you have a choice.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    It’s Dairy Queen’s most successful product ever. Over 175 million Blizzards were sold in the year following the product’s debut in 1985. The new creation was such a sales phenomenon that other fast food chains created their own soft-serve ice cream treats with mixed in chunks of cookies and candies and fruit. McDonald’s McFlurry is one popular example. Today there are over a dozen varieties of Blizzards to choose from at Dairy Queen. 

    The biggest challenge when making Blizzard replicas at home is keeping the ice cream from getting soft when the other ingredients are stirred in. To solve that problem, we’ll use a special technique inspired by marble slab ice cream stores. Servers there mix your choice of chunky ingredients with your choice of ice cream on a slab of frozen stone. This method keeps the ice cream cold and firm while mixing, until it’s served to a drooling you.

    To incorporate this technique at home you need to put a glass or ceramic bowl in the freezer for at least 30 minutes (while you’re at it you may also want to freeze the glass you’re going to serve the thing in). An hour or more is even better. We mix our ingredients in the icy bowl, while the ice cream stays frosty cold. Just be sure to use plain vanilla ice cream (not French vanilla), if you have a choice.

    The dough for this recipe comes from a tube of Pillsbury cookie dough. It's simple and really good.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    This is Red Robin’s signature non-alcoholic drink, and it's simple to make with pre-made lemonade, and strawberries that come frozen in sweet syrup. When added to the top of the ice filled lemonade glass the strawberries and syrup speckle the drink. Serve this without stirring it up.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    After adding the juices to the blender the restaurant does a “flash blend.” That means you use just a couple of pulses on high speed so that the ice is broken up into small pieces, without being completely crushed to a slushy consistency.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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