THE ORIGINAL COPYCAT RECIPES WEBSITE.

Cookies & Brownies

Items: 916 of 37, per page
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to <a href="?target=cart">your cart</a>
  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 1.00. Votes: 1

    This company was founded as the United Biscuit Company of America back in 1927. It was made up of sixteen bakeries from Philadelphia to Salt Lake City, marketing cookies and crackers under a variety of brand names. That system lasted for twenty-two years, and eventually the name Keebler was adopted for the entire conglomerate. Keebler was linked with the United Biscuit name once again after it was bought in 1974 by a British company of that name.

    Today the company makes 50 billion cookies and crackers each year; among them are the popular Pecan Sandies, first sold in 1955. The Toffee variety came thirty-eight years later.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 2.89. Votes: 9

    As you try this Chips Ahoy! copycat cookie recipe, imagine producing a quarter of a million cookies and crackers every minute. That's what Nabisco does. Which is why the conglomerate is the largest manufacturer of cookies and crackers in the world. Chips Ahoy! Chocolate Chip Cookies were developed in 1964, along with Chicken In A Biscuit Crackers and Mister Salty Pretzels. But Chips Ahoy! became the big winner for the company. Today it's the world's top-selling chocolate-chip cookie, with more than 6 billion sold every year.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    Formerly called the National Biscuit Company, Nabisco was formed in the late 1800s by several bakeries that joined together to meet a growing demand. In the 1870s Nabisco's forefathers had introduced the first individually packaged baked goods. Before this, cookies and crackers had been sold from open barrels or biscuit boxes. The company has become the world's largest manufacturer of cookies and crackers, selling some 42 million packages of Nabisco products each day to retail outlets on every continent.

    Nutter Butter Cookies were introduced in 1969 and have quickly taken their place alongside Nabisco's most popular products, including Oreos, Chips Ahoy!, and Fig Newtons.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    No one knows the exact origin of the vanilla wafer but it's guessed that the recipe was developed in the South. The wafers were being created from scratch at home long before Nabisco introduced the lightweight, poker chip-like packaged cookies in 1945. Back then they were called Vanilla Wafers. But in the 60's Nabisco slapped the trade name Nilla Wafers on the box. Today the real things come about 100 to a box and really fly when whipped into the air with a little flick of the wrist. Here now, you can relive the days of old with a homemade version fresh out of the oven. This clone recipe makes about half a box's worth, and they fly just as far.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 8

    If you're a ginger snap fanatic, clone the cookie giant's store-bought version in a, uh, snap. And if you're watching the fat, four of these cookies check in with a total of around 2.5 grams of fat.

    Nutrition Facts
    Serving size–4 cookies
    Total servings–30
    Calories per serving–110
    Fat per serving–2.5g

    Source: Low-Fat Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.53. Votes: 43

    If those cute little cookie peddlers aren't posted outside the market, it may be tough to get your hands on these—the most popular cookies sold by the Girl Scouts every spring. One out of every four boxes of cookies sold by the girls is Thin Mints. This hack Girl Scout cookie thin mint recipe uses an improved version of the chocolate wafers created for the Oreo cookie clone in the second TSR book More Top Secret Recipes. That recipe creates 108 cookie wafers, so when you're done dipping, you'll have the equivalent of three boxes of the Girl Scout Cookies favorite. That's why you bought those extra cookie sheets, right? You could, of course, reduce the recipe by baking only one-third of the cookie dough for the wafers and then reducing the coating ingredients by one-third, giving you a total of 36 cookies. But that may not be enough to last you until next spring.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

    Update 11/16/17: You can make an even better clone using a chocolate product that wasn't available when I created this recipe. Rather than using the semi-sweet chocolate chips combined with shortening and peppermint for coating the cookies, use Ghirardelli Dark Melting Wafers. You will need 2 10-ounce bags of the chips, mixed with 1/2 teaspoon of peppermint extract (and no shortening). Melt the chocolate the same way, and dip the cookies as instructed.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.63. Votes: 157

    Here's the first recipe I created for the Top Secret Recipes books back in 1987. Inspired by a bogus chain-letter cookie recipe, this is my version of the delicious Mrs. Fields cookies that are crispy around the edge and chewy in the middle. Be careful not to cook these too long. I know it becomes tempting to keep cooking these—they don't seem to be done after 10 minutes—but they will continue to cook for awhile after you take them out of the oven, and when cool, will be chewy in the middle.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.45. Votes: 11

    At one time Nabisco actually conducted a study to determined that 50 percent of Oreo consumers twist the cookie apart before eating it. I guess this is important information, since it concerns the world's top-selling cookie. Historians at Nabisco aren't sure who came up with the idea for this sandwich cookie back in 1912, but they do know that it was introduced along with two other cookie creations that have long since died. The name may have come from the Greek word for mountain, oreo, which would once have made sense because the first test version was hill-shaped. When the Oreo was first sold to the public, it was much larger than today's cookie, but it kept shrinking over the years until Nabisco realized it had become too small and had to enlarge it again to today's current 1 3/4-inch diameter. 

    In 1975, Nabisco figured we couldn't have too much of a good thing, so the company gave us Double Stuf Oreos, with twice the filling. But why stop there? Now you're free to pile as much "stuf" on your cookies as you like.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur. 

    Watch this video demo: How to Clone an Oreo Cookie (plus how to make a really BIG Oreo!).

Items: 916 of 37, per page
What's Hot
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to <a href="?target=cart">your cart</a>