The #1 Copycat Recipes Website

Condiments

Nice work. You just found copycat recipes for all of your favorite famous foods! Bestselling author and TV host, Todd Wilbur shows you how to easily duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home. See if Todd has hacked your favorite condiments here. New recipes added every week.

Products: 124 of 24
Show: 24
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    Freddy's Famous Fry Sauce

    You can't miss the bright red and white awnings featured at all 380 Freddy's Frozen Custard and Steakburgers restaurants. They are widely known for their custard and shoestring potatoes, but it's their famous fry sauce that put this joint on the map. 

    The sauce was originally developed as a dipping sauce for their famous french fries. But when Freddy's noticed customers asking for more sauce to go, they realized they had created a versatile sauce that was also excellent on burgers, hot dogs, chicken, and anything else that could use a flavor bump. 

    In 2015, Freddy's bottled their creation. Today the famous sauce can be purchased online for around $12 a bottle, but with my original Freddy's Fry Sauce recipe, you can make almost a cup of the good stuff at home for under a buck.

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  • Score: 4.80 (votes: 86)
    McDonald's Special Sauce (Big Mac Sauce)

    A big part of the Big Mac's appeal is the tasty "secret" spread slathered onto both decks of the world's most popular double-decker hamburger. So what's so special about this sauce? It's basically just thousand island dressing, right? Pretty much. But this sauce has a bit more sweet pickle relish in it than a typical thousand island salad slather. Also, I found that this clone comes close to the original with the inclusion of French dressing. It's an important ingredient—ketchup just won't do it. That, along with a sweet-and-sour flavor combo from vinegar and sugar, makes this sauce go well on any of your home burger creations, whether they're Big Mac clones or not. 

    My McDonald's special sauce recipe is super easy, but if you don't feel like making it at home, try my Burger Special Sauce for a killer bottled version of McDonald's Big Mac Sauce.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.25 (votes: 8)
    Wendy's Hot Chili Seasoning

    The little red packets of viscous hot sauce at the fast food giant have a cult following of rabid fans who will do whatever it takes to get their hands on large quantities. One such fan of the sauce commented online, "Are there any Wendy's employees or managers out there who will mail me an entire case of Hot Chili Seasoning? I swear this is not a joke. I love the stuff. I tip extra cash to Wendy's workers to get big handfuls of the stuff." Well, there's really no need to tip any Wendy's employees, because now you can clone as much of Wendy's Hot Chili Seasoning as you want in your own kitchen with this Top Secret Recipe.

    The ingredients listed on the real Hot Chili Seasoning are water, corn syrup, salt, distilled vinegar, natural flavors, xanthan gum, and extractives of paprika. We'll use many of those same ingredients for our clone, but we'll substitute gelatin for the xanthan gum (a thickener) to get the slightly gooey consistency right. For the natural flavor and color we'll use cayenne pepper, cumin, paprika, and garlic powder, then filter the particles out with a fine wire-mesh strainer after they've contributed what the sauce needs.

    My Wendy's Hot Chili Seasoning recipe makes 5 ounces of sauce— just the right amount to fit nicely into a used hot sauce bottle—and costs just pennies to make. 

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  • Score: 4.82 (votes: 44)
    Hellmann's - Best Foods Mayonnaise

    One day in France in 1756, when Duke de Richelieu's chef couldn't find any cream for a sauce made with eggs and cream, he substituted oil. The thick emulsion that formed after a vigorous beating became one of the basic sauces for our modern cuisine. A version of this simple culinary breakthrough was an important ingredient for Richard Hellmann's salads in the deli he opened in New York City in 1905. When Richard started selling his mayonnaise by the jar at the deli, the bottles flew out the door. Before long Hellmann's creamy mayonnaise dominated in the eastern United States, while another company, Best Foods, was having incredible sales success with mayonnaise west of the Rockies. In 1932 Best Foods bought Hellmann's, and today the two brands split the country: Best Foods is sold west of the Rockies and Hellmann's can be found to the east. Nowadays the two mayonnaise recipes are nearly identical, although some people claim that Best Foods mayonnaise is a little tangier.

    In my Hellmann's / Best Foods Mayonnaise recipe below, you'll be creating an emulsion by whisking a stream of oil into a beaten egg yolk. The solution will begin to magically thicken and change color, and before you know it you'll be looking at a bowl of beautiful, off-white, fresh mayonnaise. I've found the best way to add the oil to the egg yolk a little bit at a time while whisking is to pour the oil into a plastic squirt bottle like the kind used for ketchup or mustard. This will allow you to whisk continuously with one hand while squirting oil with the other. You can also use a measuring cup with a spout and pour the oil in a thin stream.

    Fans of Miracle Whip will enjoy my copycat recipe here. You can also find recipes for ketchup and mustard here. Yep, I've got you covered.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.69 (votes: 80)
    Heinz Ketchup

    By the age of 12 John Heinz was peddling produce from his family's garden in post-Civil War Pittsburgh. By age 25, he and a friend launched Heinz & Noble to sell bottled horseradish in clear glass bottles that revealed its purity. Henry's pickling empire grew as he added jams, jellies, and condiments to the line, including ketchup, which was added in 1876. You'll still see the famous Heinz pickle logo on every product, and if you want a quick tip on how to get the thick stuff out of the bottle easily, don't pound on the backside like a maniac. Instead, Heinz recommends a good smack to the embossed "57" found on the neck of every bottle. 

    Today, Heinz is the world's largest tomato processor, with the famous ketchup bottles sitting on a shelf somewhere in over half of U.S. households. But if one day you find your house is all out, you can use my Heinz ketchup recipe below with a few common ingredients and get a whole 12-ounce bottle worth of thick, tasty ketchup.

    If you're looking to avoid high fructose corn syrup and refined sugar, check out my clone for Real Ketchup here.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Not rated yet
    Hellmann's - Best Foods Real Ketchup

    Hellmann’s—or Best Foods as the company is known west of the Rockies—recently debuted this new ketchup for customers looking to avoid high fructose corn syrup, refined sugar, and artificial ingredients. The label lists only six ingredients: tomato puree, honey, white wine vinegar, salt, onion powder, and spices. It wasn’t immediately clear what the “spices” referred to until I wiped a wide smear of the ketchup across a white plate, making the blacks specks of fine grind pepper clearly stand out. After that, creating my Best Foods Real Ketchup recipe was just a matter of getting the ratios right.

    If you're a fan of the original Heinz Ketchup, check out my clone recipe here

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  • Score: 4.75 (votes: 4)
    French's Classic Yellow Mustard

    Americans' passion for yellow mustard began in St. Louis at the 1904 World's Fair when the tangy sauce was spread over the top of the classic American hot dog. Today, over 100 years later, French's mustard is the top brand found in restaurants, and 80 percent of U.S. households have a bottle of French's somewhere in the pantry or fridge. Those bottles will eventually run dry. And if that happens to you, you may need to whip up some of your own yellow mustard in a flash. If you've got dry ground mustard and turmeric in the spice rack, you can easily clone some yellow mustard sauce. This recipe yields just 1/4 cup of yellow mustard, but that should hold you over. At least until you can get to the store for more of the real thing.

    Ready to make all your favorite condiments at home? Click here for more of my copycat recipes. 

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    Heinz Mayochup

    The basic recipe of two parts mayonnaise to one part ketchup has been around for years, served as a condiment with French fries and other fried finger foods. It’s commonly called “fry sauce,” but Heinz chefs added a few more ingredients to their version of the sauce, making it more sweet-and-sour than the common two-ingredient formula, and then they gave it a new name.

    Heinz debuted Mayochup in September of 2018 following a carefully planned social media campaign that polled followers on whether or not they wanted Heinz to create the product. Final result: 55 percent said “yes.” 

    Now you can make your own mimicked Mayochup in a matter of minutes with these five common ingredients, a bowl, and a whisk. Use it on burgers and sandwiches, or as a dip for French fries and other fried foods.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.89 (votes: 19)
    Kraft Miracle Whip

    Even though this stuff looks like mayonnaise, Food and Drug Administration dudes say it has to be called "dressing." Miracle Whip was invented in 1933 as a sweeter, more flavorful alternative to mayonnaise, but it contains a few extra ingredients that the FDA says aren't supposed to be in mayonnaise, such as sugar, paprika, and garlic powder. If you're a fan of Kraft's variation on the creamy white mother sauce, you must try my Kraft Miracle Whip recipe. 

    As with homemade mayonnaise, you make a simple emulsion with egg yolk and oil. Add in the other ingredients, and you've got yourself a Miracle Whip kitchen copy that's way fresher than any bottle on store shelves. 

    Make all your favorite condiments at home with my secret recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.80 (votes: 5)
    Heinz Heinz 57

    In the late 1800s Henry John Heinz established the slogan "57 Varieties," which you can still find printed on Heinz products even though the company now boasts over 5700 varieties in 200 countries. Today Heinz is the world's largest tomato producer, but interestingly the first product for the company that was launched in 1869 had nothing to do with tomatoes—it was grated horseradish. It wasn't until 1876 that ketchup was added to the growing company's product line.

    Tomato is also an important ingredient in Heinz 57 steak sauce. But you'll find some interesting ingredients in there as well, such as raisin purée, malt vinegar, apple juice concentrate, and mustard. And don't worry if your version doesn't come out as brown as the original. Heinz uses a little caramel coloring in its product to give it that distinctive tint. It's just for looks though, so I've left that ingredient out of my Heinz 57 recipe. The turmeric and yellow mustard will help tint this version a little bit like the color of the real deal.

    Try my homemade versions of Heinz Ketchup, Mayochup, and Heinz premium chili sauce

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 3)
    Taco Bell Diablo Sauce

    The hottest of Taco Bell’s five hot sauces cranks up the heat meter with a special blend of peppers for true chili heads. Diablo Sauce was introduced on Cinco de Mayo in 2015 as a limited-time-only product and was soon discontinued. But demanding fans pleaded for the chain to bring the sauce back, and on May 5 of the following year, Diablo Sauce got a permanent spot in the Taco Bell hot-sauce lineup.

    According to Taco Bell, the sauce contains aji panca, a sweet Peruvian red pepper, and chipotle, which is smoked red jalapeño. Since aji panca can be hard to find, we'll use ground ancho instead, which has a similar taste. There are other peppers in Diablo Sauce which remain a mystery, but it's easy to tell that at least one of them comes packing big heat. I added habanero and cayenne and the sauce had a perfect kick.

    Purée all of it in a blender, then cook it for 10 minutes. Once it’s cooled, you’ll have an easy home copy of Taco Bell Diablo sauce, with great flavor and heat that’ll turn your face red, just like the real one.

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  • Score: 4.67 (votes: 3)
    Taco Bell Fire Border Sauce

    For years Taco Bell customers had only the "mild" and "hot" varieties of free taco sauce blister packs to choose from to kick up their fistful of tacos. That is, until a recent addition to the hot sauce selection bumped the heat-o-meter up a few notches. True chili heads might find this sauce mild when compared with the glut of extreme pepper sauces on the market today, but it's definitely an improvement on the Mexican fast-food chain's original hot sauce formula. Try my Taco Bell Fire Border sauce recipe below and let me know what you think.

    Make those famous Taco Bell tacos, Chalupas, and more here

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.46 (votes: 13)
    Taco Bell Mild Border Sauce

    If you like the flavor of Taco Bell's sauce but don't like the burn, this is the sauce for you. It used to be that you could only get this sauce in the little blister packs from Taco Bell restaurants, but now the chain has partnered with Kraft Foods to sell the stuff in 7.5-ounce bottles in supermarkets. For the record, those bottles of hot sauce will set you back around $1.59 at the store, while the 6-ounce can of tomato paste required for this copycat Taco Bell mild sauce recipe is only 59 cents—and you end up with more than three times the amount of sauce.

    Find more of my copycat Taco Bell sauces, tacos, and burritos here

    Sauce: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.17 (votes: 6)
    Taco Bell Lava Sauce

    Sales erupted at Taco Bell when the chain introduced the new Volcano Taco in September 2008. A red corn tortilla shell filled with standard taco ingredients including spiced ground beef, lettuce, and cheese, is topped with a super-spicy cheese-based secret ingredient called Lava Sauce that makes this product one of the chain's most successful new menu items. When the Volcano Taco was removed from stores three months after its launch, internet groups quickly formed demanding the product's hasty return. Those campaigns worked. The Volcano taco returned to Taco Bell as a permanent menu item, along with a new burrito that also features the Lava Sauce.

    But there's no need to go all the way to Taco Bell and beg for extra sauce if you want to spread the same spicy joy on your homemade Mexican-style creations. Get a box of Kraft Macaroni & Cheese and use the powdered cheese inside to whip up your own Lava Sauce clone. Cayenne pepper cranks the sauce up to 800 Scoville units of heat compared to Taco Bell's Fire Sauce at 500 Scoville units, which makes this the hottest stuff you can get at the chain. Now, with this secret formula, you can adjust the heat up or down to your preference just by playing with the amount of cayenne you add. You can also make the sauce lower in fat by using reduced-fat mayo.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.29 (votes: 7)
    Taco Bell Baja Sauce

    This is the spicy sauce that comes on your Gordita or Chalupa at Taco Bell. But the only way to get a significant amount of the delicious creamy sauce to use at home on tacos, fajitas, and burritos is by making some yourself. With my Taco Bell Baja Sauce recipe below, you will make enough to hold you over for a while. 

    You need a food processor to purée the vegetables, but don't expect to use all the purée. I've made the measurements for the purée larger than required so that your food processor will have something to grab on to. This is a mayo-based sauce, so if you want to eliminate some fat, use light mayonnaise in the recipe and make low-fat homemade Baja Sauce. You can't get that at Taco Bell.

    Find more of your favorite Taco Bell sauce recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    Taco Bell Hot Taco Sauce

    Here's a way to make plenty of hot sauce that tastes just like the stuff people are pouring over the tacos at Taco Bell. If you like it even hotter, check out my recipes for Taco Bell Diablo SauceFire Border Sauce, and Lava Sauce.

    Now that you've got your sauce, whatcha gonna slather it on?  Find all your favorite Taco Bell copycat recipes here

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.76 (votes: 33)
    Subway Chipotle Southwest Sauce

    Everyone hip on Subway's sandwiches knows the key to cloning the flavor of many of the chain's top-sellers is in hacking the secret sauces. For example, Subway's Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki Sandwich is pretty bland without the Sweet Onion Sauce. And one of Subway's newest creations, the Chipotle Southwest Cheese Steak, is just a cheese steak sandwich without the Chipotle Southwest Sauce. 

    Now, with my Subway's Chipotle Southwest Sauce recipe, you can re-create the slightly sweet, mildly sour, and little bit smoky sauce at home to take any of your home sandwich creations on a trip to the spicy Southwest. But you don't have to stop at sandwiches. This sauce also makes an amazing dressing for a zesty Southwestern-style salad. You'll need to pick up some ground chipotle chile in the spice section of your market. McCormick makes good stuff.

    Find more of my Subway copycat recipes here.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.71 (votes: 7)
    Subway Bourbon Street Glaze

    Let's face it, it's the sauce that makes this sandwich so good. If you take the Bourbon Street Glaze away from Subway's new Bourbon Street Chicken Sandwich, you end up with...a boring chicken sub. 

    Use my Subway Bourbon Street glaze recipe to make the secret sauce, then drizzle it over your next boring chicken sub to experience the greatness that is one of Subway's most delicious products.

    If you're a fan of the Subway Sweet Onion Sauce, click here for my recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.31 (votes: 13)
    Subway Sweet Onion Sauce

    The Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki Sandwich, one of Subway's biggest new product rollouts, is made with common ingredients: teriyaki-glazed chicken breast strips, onions, lettuce, tomatoes, green peppers, and olives. But what sets it apart from all other teriyaki chicken sandwiches is Subway's delicious Sweet Onion Sauce. You can ask for as much of the scrumptious sauce as you want on your custom-made sub at the huge sandwich chain, but you won't get any extra to take home, even if you offer to pay. Now you can pour a copycat version of the sauce to your home-built sandwich masterpieces whenever you want.

    Find more copycat recipes for famous sauces here.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    Bojangles' Bo's Special Sauce

    Bojangles’ was founded in 1977 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and today the 750-unit chain is famous throughout the southeastern U.S. for its juicy fried chicken, fluffy buttermilk biscuits, and Cajun dirty rice.

    And just like McDonald’s, Bo’s has a special sauce that’s pretty famous too. It’s arguably much better than McDonald’s Big Mac sauce, especially if you like the flavors of horseradish and roasted red bell pepper. The lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and sugar team up for the appropriate sweet-and-sour notes found in any decent special sauce, and the herbs add a nice finish you don’t get with other sandwich sauces. You might also like to know that my Bo's special sauce recipe is made without the high-fructose corn syrup that’s listed as the third ingredient in the real thing.

    Mix everything in a bowl and park it in the fridge for a spell so the flavors can mingle, then use the sauce as you see fit on sandwiches made with fried chicken, grilled chicken, and roast beef, or as a dip for chicken fingers and nuggets.

    Get this recipe in "Top Secret Recipes Unleashed" exclusively on Amazon.com.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.67 (votes: 6)
    Arby's Horsey Sauce

    Even though Arby's has diversified its menu over the years with toasted subs and deli-style sandwiches on sliced whole wheat bread, it's the thinly-sliced roast beef piled high on hamburger buns that originally made this chain famous. Since roast beef and horseradish go so beautifully together, Arby's created this delicious mayo-based horseradish sauce as a spread for the roast beef sandwiches. It also happens to be great on your homemade sandwiches too, but it just isn't cool to hoard handfuls of those blister packs to take home with you. So, with the help of my Arby's Horsey Sauce recipe, you can clone as much sauce as you want. First step: get out the blender. You'll need it to purée the horseradish into the mix so that the sauce is smooth and creamy like the real deal.

    You might also like my Arby's BBQ sauce recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    Aunt Jemima Maple Syrup

    The year 1989 marked the 100th anniversary of the Aunt Jemima trademark. The name was conceived in 1889 by Chris Rutt while he was attending a vaudeville show and watching a New Orleans-style dance number performed to a jazzy tune called "Aunt Jemima." Rutt liked the music so much he stuck the name on his products. The maple syrup came along much later, in 1964, and is now the country's largest-selling syrup.

    Today some folks tell the story of how their friends or relatives once met Aunt Jemima many years ago and how she was a kind and cordial woman. Little do they realize these people were fooled by a promotional campaign for the products back in the forties and fifties that used actresses traveling from town to town dressed up and acting like the "famous women." There never really was an Aunt Jemima.

    Looking for a great pancake recipe? I've cloned dozens from Denny's to IHOP. Find your favorite here.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.10 (votes: 40)
    Arby's Sauce

    The beef sandwiches from Arby's would be very hard to duplicate, since they are made from specially processed hunks of beef that are then thinly sliced with a deli-style meat slicer. However, the sweet-and-tangy BBQ sauce can be cloned easily. You can make my copycat Arby's sauce recipe with just a few basic ingredients and add it to a variety of homemade sandwich creations, even barbecued ribs or chicken. 

    If you love Arby's Horsey sauce, Bronco Berry Sauce or the Jamoca Shake, you can get those recipes here

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.56 (votes: 9)
    Heinz Premium Chili Sauce

    The name of this tomato-based sauce belies its taste. There's not even a hint of spiciness here that someone might associate with "chili." Instead you get a sweet and sour sauce that's got more tang than ketchup, and more chunks. And what are those chunks? According to the label they're dehydrated onions, so that's exactly what we'll use in this formula. Be sure to get the kind that say dried "minced" onions, because dried "chopped" onions are too big. The recipe is a simple one since you just combine everything in a saucepan and simmer until done. And if you cruise down to the Tidbits at the bottom of this recipe, I'll show you a super-easy way to turn this saucy clone into a beautiful carbon copy of Heinz Seafood Cocktail Sauce.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    Freddy's Famous Fry Sauce

    You can't miss the bright red and white awnings featured at all 380 Freddy's Frozen Custard and Steakburgers restaurants. They are widely known for their custard and shoestring potatoes, but it's their famous fry sauce that put this joint on the map. 

    The sauce was originally developed as a dipping sauce for their famous french fries. But when Freddy's noticed customers asking for more sauce to go, they realized they had created a versatile sauce that was also excellent on burgers, hot dogs, chicken, and anything else that could use a flavor bump. 

    In 2015, Freddy's bottled their creation. Today the famous sauce can be purchased online for around $12 a bottle, but with my original Freddy's Fry Sauce recipe, you can make almost a cup of the good stuff at home for under a buck.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    Bojangles' Bo's Special Sauce

    Bojangles’ was founded in 1977 in Charlotte, North Carolina, and today the 750-unit chain is famous throughout the southeastern U.S. for its juicy fried chicken, fluffy buttermilk biscuits, and Cajun dirty rice.

    And just like McDonald’s, Bo’s has a special sauce that’s pretty famous too. It’s arguably much better than McDonald’s Big Mac sauce, especially if you like the flavors of horseradish and roasted red bell pepper. The lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and sugar team up for the appropriate sweet-and-sour notes found in any decent special sauce, and the herbs add a nice finish you don’t get with other sandwich sauces. You might also like to know that my Bo's special sauce recipe is made without the high-fructose corn syrup that’s listed as the third ingredient in the real thing.

    Mix everything in a bowl and park it in the fridge for a spell so the flavors can mingle, then use the sauce as you see fit on sandwiches made with fried chicken, grilled chicken, and roast beef, or as a dip for chicken fingers and nuggets.

    Get this recipe in "Top Secret Recipes Unleashed" exclusively on Amazon.com.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 3)
    Taco Bell Diablo Sauce

    The hottest of Taco Bell’s five hot sauces cranks up the heat meter with a special blend of peppers for true chili heads. Diablo Sauce was introduced on Cinco de Mayo in 2015 as a limited-time-only product and was soon discontinued. But demanding fans pleaded for the chain to bring the sauce back, and on May 5 of the following year, Diablo Sauce got a permanent spot in the Taco Bell hot-sauce lineup.

    According to Taco Bell, the sauce contains aji panca, a sweet Peruvian red pepper, and chipotle, which is smoked red jalapeño. Since aji panca can be hard to find, we'll use ground ancho instead, which has a similar taste. There are other peppers in Diablo Sauce which remain a mystery, but it's easy to tell that at least one of them comes packing big heat. I added habanero and cayenne and the sauce had a perfect kick.

    Purée all of it in a blender, then cook it for 10 minutes. Once it’s cooled, you’ll have an easy home copy of Taco Bell Diablo sauce, with great flavor and heat that’ll turn your face red, just like the real one.

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 1)
    Heinz Mayochup

    The basic recipe of two parts mayonnaise to one part ketchup has been around for years, served as a condiment with French fries and other fried finger foods. It’s commonly called “fry sauce,” but Heinz chefs added a few more ingredients to their version of the sauce, making it more sweet-and-sour than the common two-ingredient formula, and then they gave it a new name.

    Heinz debuted Mayochup in September of 2018 following a carefully planned social media campaign that polled followers on whether or not they wanted Heinz to create the product. Final result: 55 percent said “yes.” 

    Now you can make your own mimicked Mayochup in a matter of minutes with these five common ingredients, a bowl, and a whisk. Use it on burgers and sandwiches, or as a dip for French fries and other fried foods.

    Read more
  • Not rated yet
    Hellmann's - Best Foods Real Ketchup

    Hellmann’s—or Best Foods as the company is known west of the Rockies—recently debuted this new ketchup for customers looking to avoid high fructose corn syrup, refined sugar, and artificial ingredients. The label lists only six ingredients: tomato puree, honey, white wine vinegar, salt, onion powder, and spices. It wasn’t immediately clear what the “spices” referred to until I wiped a wide smear of the ketchup across a white plate, making the blacks specks of fine grind pepper clearly stand out. After that, creating my Best Foods Real Ketchup recipe was just a matter of getting the ratios right.

    If you're a fan of the original Heinz Ketchup, check out my clone recipe here

    Read more
  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    Taco Bell Hot Taco Sauce

    Here's a way to make plenty of hot sauce that tastes just like the stuff people are pouring over the tacos at Taco Bell. If you like it even hotter, check out my recipes for Taco Bell Diablo SauceFire Border Sauce, and Lava Sauce.

    Now that you've got your sauce, whatcha gonna slather it on?  Find all your favorite Taco Bell copycat recipes here

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.46 (votes: 13)
    Taco Bell Mild Border Sauce

    If you like the flavor of Taco Bell's sauce but don't like the burn, this is the sauce for you. It used to be that you could only get this sauce in the little blister packs from Taco Bell restaurants, but now the chain has partnered with Kraft Foods to sell the stuff in 7.5-ounce bottles in supermarkets. For the record, those bottles of hot sauce will set you back around $1.59 at the store, while the 6-ounce can of tomato paste required for this copycat Taco Bell mild sauce recipe is only 59 cents—and you end up with more than three times the amount of sauce.

    Find more of my copycat Taco Bell sauces, tacos, and burritos here

    Sauce: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.17 (votes: 6)
    Taco Bell Lava Sauce

    Sales erupted at Taco Bell when the chain introduced the new Volcano Taco in September 2008. A red corn tortilla shell filled with standard taco ingredients including spiced ground beef, lettuce, and cheese, is topped with a super-spicy cheese-based secret ingredient called Lava Sauce that makes this product one of the chain's most successful new menu items. When the Volcano Taco was removed from stores three months after its launch, internet groups quickly formed demanding the product's hasty return. Those campaigns worked. The Volcano taco returned to Taco Bell as a permanent menu item, along with a new burrito that also features the Lava Sauce.

    But there's no need to go all the way to Taco Bell and beg for extra sauce if you want to spread the same spicy joy on your homemade Mexican-style creations. Get a box of Kraft Macaroni & Cheese and use the powdered cheese inside to whip up your own Lava Sauce clone. Cayenne pepper cranks the sauce up to 800 Scoville units of heat compared to Taco Bell's Fire Sauce at 500 Scoville units, which makes this the hottest stuff you can get at the chain. Now, with this secret formula, you can adjust the heat up or down to your preference just by playing with the amount of cayenne you add. You can also make the sauce lower in fat by using reduced-fat mayo.

    Read more
  • Score: 4.67 (votes: 3)
    Taco Bell Fire Border Sauce

    For years Taco Bell customers had only the "mild" and "hot" varieties of free taco sauce blister packs to choose from to kick up their fistful of tacos. That is, until a recent addition to the hot sauce selection bumped the heat-o-meter up a few notches. True chili heads might find this sauce mild when compared with the glut of extreme pepper sauces on the market today, but it's definitely an improvement on the Mexican fast-food chain's original hot sauce formula. Try my Taco Bell Fire Border sauce recipe below and let me know what you think.

    Make those famous Taco Bell tacos, Chalupas, and more here

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 5.00 (votes: 2)
    Aunt Jemima Maple Syrup

    The year 1989 marked the 100th anniversary of the Aunt Jemima trademark. The name was conceived in 1889 by Chris Rutt while he was attending a vaudeville show and watching a New Orleans-style dance number performed to a jazzy tune called "Aunt Jemima." Rutt liked the music so much he stuck the name on his products. The maple syrup came along much later, in 1964, and is now the country's largest-selling syrup.

    Today some folks tell the story of how their friends or relatives once met Aunt Jemima many years ago and how she was a kind and cordial woman. Little do they realize these people were fooled by a promotional campaign for the products back in the forties and fifties that used actresses traveling from town to town dressed up and acting like the "famous women." There never really was an Aunt Jemima.

    Looking for a great pancake recipe? I've cloned dozens from Denny's to IHOP. Find your favorite here.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.67 (votes: 6)
    Arby's Horsey Sauce

    Even though Arby's has diversified its menu over the years with toasted subs and deli-style sandwiches on sliced whole wheat bread, it's the thinly-sliced roast beef piled high on hamburger buns that originally made this chain famous. Since roast beef and horseradish go so beautifully together, Arby's created this delicious mayo-based horseradish sauce as a spread for the roast beef sandwiches. It also happens to be great on your homemade sandwiches too, but it just isn't cool to hoard handfuls of those blister packs to take home with you. So, with the help of my Arby's Horsey Sauce recipe, you can clone as much sauce as you want. First step: get out the blender. You'll need it to purée the horseradish into the mix so that the sauce is smooth and creamy like the real deal.

    You might also like my Arby's BBQ sauce recipe.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.10 (votes: 40)
    Arby's Sauce

    The beef sandwiches from Arby's would be very hard to duplicate, since they are made from specially processed hunks of beef that are then thinly sliced with a deli-style meat slicer. However, the sweet-and-tangy BBQ sauce can be cloned easily. You can make my copycat Arby's sauce recipe with just a few basic ingredients and add it to a variety of homemade sandwich creations, even barbecued ribs or chicken. 

    If you love Arby's Horsey sauce, Bronco Berry Sauce or the Jamoca Shake, you can get those recipes here

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.89 (votes: 19)
    Kraft Miracle Whip

    Even though this stuff looks like mayonnaise, Food and Drug Administration dudes say it has to be called "dressing." Miracle Whip was invented in 1933 as a sweeter, more flavorful alternative to mayonnaise, but it contains a few extra ingredients that the FDA says aren't supposed to be in mayonnaise, such as sugar, paprika, and garlic powder. If you're a fan of Kraft's variation on the creamy white mother sauce, you must try my Kraft Miracle Whip recipe. 

    As with homemade mayonnaise, you make a simple emulsion with egg yolk and oil. Add in the other ingredients, and you've got yourself a Miracle Whip kitchen copy that's way fresher than any bottle on store shelves. 

    Make all your favorite condiments at home with my secret recipes here

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.56 (votes: 9)
    Heinz Premium Chili Sauce

    The name of this tomato-based sauce belies its taste. There's not even a hint of spiciness here that someone might associate with "chili." Instead you get a sweet and sour sauce that's got more tang than ketchup, and more chunks. And what are those chunks? According to the label they're dehydrated onions, so that's exactly what we'll use in this formula. Be sure to get the kind that say dried "minced" onions, because dried "chopped" onions are too big. The recipe is a simple one since you just combine everything in a saucepan and simmer until done. And if you cruise down to the Tidbits at the bottom of this recipe, I'll show you a super-easy way to turn this saucy clone into a beautiful carbon copy of Heinz Seafood Cocktail Sauce.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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  • Score: 4.69 (votes: 80)
    Heinz Ketchup

    By the age of 12 John Heinz was peddling produce from his family's garden in post-Civil War Pittsburgh. By age 25, he and a friend launched Heinz & Noble to sell bottled horseradish in clear glass bottles that revealed its purity. Henry's pickling empire grew as he added jams, jellies, and condiments to the line, including ketchup, which was added in 1876. You'll still see the famous Heinz pickle logo on every product, and if you want a quick tip on how to get the thick stuff out of the bottle easily, don't pound on the backside like a maniac. Instead, Heinz recommends a good smack to the embossed "57" found on the neck of every bottle. 

    Today, Heinz is the world's largest tomato processor, with the famous ketchup bottles sitting on a shelf somewhere in over half of U.S. households. But if one day you find your house is all out, you can use my Heinz ketchup recipe below with a few common ingredients and get a whole 12-ounce bottle worth of thick, tasty ketchup.

    If you're looking to avoid high fructose corn syrup and refined sugar, check out my clone for Real Ketchup here.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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I'm Todd Wilbur, Chronic Food Hacker

For over 30 years I've been deconstructing America's most iconic brand-name foods to make the best original clone recipes for you to use at home. Welcome to my lab.

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