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Nice work. You just found recipes for all of your favorite famous brand-name foods! Bestselling author and TV host Todd Wilbur shows you how to easily duplicate the taste of iconic dishes and treats at home for less money than eating out. Todd's recipes are easy to follow and fun to make! See if Todd has hacked your favorite brands here. New recipes added every week.

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    Score: 4.00. Votes: 1

    According to Main On Foods, the manufacturer and distributor of Twin Dragon Almond Cookies, the original recipe was brought to this country in 1951 by a Chinese baker who owned a small corner shop in downtown Los Angeles. That retail bakery is gone now, but its most popular product, the world's best-tasting almond cookie, is still selling.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 4

    The Smith Family has a secret recipe. Those in the family (the girls) who know the delicious top secret turkey chili recipe refuse to share it with other family members (one guy in particular). Can I crack the secret formula and figure out the recipe for this desperate, hungry sibling? Find out how close I get with this hack on The Steve Harvey Show. Watch the video. Then make the recipe for yourself.

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    Here's a simple one that clones the most popular brand of seasoned bread crumbs. Toss all of the ingredients into a small bowl, mix it up, and you're done. Use the finished product for an Italian-style breading—when frying or baking chicken, fish, pork chops, eggplant, etc.—just as you would the store-bought stuff.  

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    To make your own version of the syrup for this orange soda that comes to us from the Pepsi-Cola Company, you need to combine a simple syrup recipe with two popular versions of dry orange mix: Kool-Aid orange unsweetened drink mix and Tang. But unlike the real thing that contains no juice, your homemade version includes a bit of real orange juice solids that come powdered into every scoop of Tang mix. After you make the syrup, be sure to let it cool in the refrigerator before you combine it with cold soda water.  

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits, & Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.00. Votes: 1

    Texan David Pace had been selling 58 different varieties of jam, jellies, and sauces from the back of his liquor store in the 1940s when he came up with a recipe for a thick and spicy tomato-based sauce he dubbed "Picante." When sales of David's new sauce took off, he concentrated all his efforts on marketing his all-natural, preservative-free product, and designed the sauces famous hourglass-shaped jar (to keep it from tipping over). Now America's number one Mexican hot sauce brand, Pace Foods, makes it known that it still uses only fresh jalapeno peppers in the sauces, rather than the brined, less flavorful jalapenos—like those canned nacho slices. Each year all the fresh jalapenos used by the company weigh in at around 30 million pounds, and the nation gobbles up around 120 million pounds of the spicy sauces. Here's a simple recipe to make a kitchen copy of the medium heat-level Pace Picante Sauce, which was the first variety David created. The mild and hot versions were added in 1981, and you'll find clones for those at the bottom of the recipe in Tidbits.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.78. Votes: 32

    Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits and Shakes by Todd Wilbur

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    Score: 4.85. Votes: 26

    What is it about Stouffer's Macaroni & Cheese that makes it the number one choice for true mac & cheese maniacs? It's probably the simple recipe that includes wholesome ingredients like skim milk and real Cheddar cheese, without any preservatives or unpronounceable chemicals. This basic formula is great for kitchen cloners who want an easy fix that doesn't require much shopping. I found the recipe to work best as an exact duplicate of the actual product: a frozen dish that you heat up later in the oven. This way you'll get slightly browned macaroni & cheese that looks like it posed for the nicely lit photo on the Stouffer's box. Since you'll only need about 3/4 cup of uncooked elbow macaroni for each recipe, you can make several 4-person servings with just one 16-ounce box of macaroni, and then keep them all in the freezer until the days when your troops have their mac & cheese attacks. Be sure to use freshly shredded Cheddar cheese here, since it melts much better than pre-shredded cheese (and it's cheaper). Use a whisk to stir the sauce often as it thickens, so that you get a smooth—not lumpy or grainy—finished product. 

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 3.75. Votes: 4

    Brothers Jacob and Joseph Loose had a dream of creating products in a bakery filled with sunshine. In 1912 they got their wish by opening the famous "Thousand Window Bakery" in Long Island City, New York. It was the largest bakery in the world until 1955. Today Sunshine Biscuits has moved to another location in Sayerville, New Jersey, where ovens the size of football fields bake like crazy every day. Sunshine is now owned by Keebler and continues to produce many baked treats you're familiar with, such as Hydrox Cookies, Saltine Crackers, Vienna Fingers, Cheez-it Crackers, and these sweet Lemon Coolers. By making a few simple adjustments to the Nilla Wafer clone recipe, we can create a cool copy of these awesome little citrusy wafer cookies dusted with lemon-flavored powdered sugar. To make that coating, we'll use a little unsweeteneed Kool-Aid lemonade drink mix combined with powdered sugar. Shake the cookies in a bag with this mixture—we'll call it bake 'n shake—and you've got yourself another tasty knock-off. Try this Sunshine Lemon Cooler cookies recipe today!

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    In 1972, brothers-in-law Leonard Marsh and Hyman Golden had become tired of running a window-washing business. They contacted their friend Arnold Greenberg and told him they wanted to start selling bottle fruit juices. Greenberg had a health-food store and thought their idea for all-natural beverages was a good one, so together they started selling pure fruit juices under the name Unadulterated Food Products. It took the trio about a decade to acquire the name they really wanted, Snapple, for $500 from a guy in Texas who has used it on an apple soda that bombed. Snapple's big break came in 1988, when the company started bottling ready-to-drink iced teas. It took only five years for Snapple to become the leader in the iced tea market, blowing away giants Lipton and Nestea. The Snapple iced tea phenomenon helped the company increase sales between 1988 and 1992 by nearly 1,300 percent.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 4

    This orange-colored spice blend has been perking up salads, pasta, potatoes, hamburgers, and vegetables for years now, but there has never been a home clone for the stuff. Time to change that. While it's obvious that sesame seeds are a major part of this blend, you may not know that the main ingredient is Romano cheese—in the bottle it's tinted orange by the paprika. Be sure to store this one in the refrigerator. You might even want to keep the seasoning in an empty shaker-top spice bottle. And if you're in the mood for some tasty pasta salad, just check out the Tidbit below that comes right off the bottle of the original product.

    Source: Even More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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