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    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    Now you can make a home clone for this refreshing citrus beverage in no time at all. Just add lemon and lime juice to a syrup solution, along with a little Kool-Aid lemonade drink mix for that special tang thanks to included citric acid, and you're almost there. When the syrup has cooled, mix it into some cold soda water in a 1 to 4 ratio. That's it. You've just made this clone of 7-UP yours.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits and Shakes by Todd Wilbur.

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    Score: 4.77. Votes: 31

    Put on a big red smile. Now you can make your own version of the popular convenience store slush, complete with brain freeze. You must have a blender to make this clone of 7-Eleven's Slurpee, and enough room to stick that blender into your freezer to get it nice and thick. This recipe gets close to the original with Kool-Aid mix and a little help from cherry extract, but you can make this drink with any flavor Kool-Aid mix (if you decide to make some variations, don't worry about adding extract). This recipe makes enough to fill one of those giant-size 32-ounce cups you find at the convenience store. Now I should hack the spoon-straws.

    Source: Top Secret Recipes: Sodas, Smoothies, Spirits and Shakes by Todd Wilbur

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    Score: 3.00. Votes: 1

    In 1914, Charles H. Miller came up with this molasses and peanut butter candy and named it after his favorite aunt. His candy company flourished, selling many confections, but none as popular as the Mary Jane. Eventually all other candies were discontinued and Mary Janes were the only candy produced by the Miller company. Miller tried playing with the formula to improve the candy, but none could compare to the original. In 1985, Stark Candy Company bought the Miller company and added the Stark name to the wrapper. Even though ownership has changed, the Mary Jane recipe is the same as it was over 100 years ago.

    Source: More Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

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