THE ORIGINAL COPYCAT RECIPES WEBSITE

K - O

Items: 110 of 75, per page
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to <a href="?target=cart">your cart</a>
  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.00. Votes: 21

    On November 18, 2009 Kellogg Co. reported a nationwide shortage of its popular Eggo frozen waffles because of interruptions at two of the four plants that make them. Historic amounts of rain closed a plant in Atlanta, and production lines at the bakery in Rossville, Tennessee were closed indefinitely for repairs. A company spokesperson claims that it would take until the summer of 2010 before shelves across the country were re-stocked at pre-shutdown levels. I hadn't cloned Eggo Waffles, but once I heard this news I immediately got to work. Fortunately, I was able to snag some of the last few boxes of several varieties of Eggos at a local Albertson's supermarket, and after a few hours in the lab I pounded out a brand-new clone recipe for everyone who is missing their Eggos. This recipe creates undercooked waffles—the homestyle version plus three other varieties, see Tidbits–that you'll be able to keep in your freezer until you get your Eggo craving. When it's time to make the waffles, drop your home-cloned version into a toaster just as you would the original Eggos. Depending on the size of your waffle iron, you may have to break or cut the waffles in half to get them to fit all the way into your toaster. Be sure to switch your toaster to its lowest setting before popping them in, and in just a couple minutes you'll be saying, "Leggo my cloned Eggo."

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    Who is Otis Spunkmeyer? Actually, he does not exist. The character who flies around in the plane pictured on the product labels, searching the world for premium ingredients, is just a catchy name dreamed up by founder Ken Rawling's 12-year-old daughter.

    The company offers low-fat versions of many of its 11 varieties of muffins, but they are more difficult to track down than the original versions. 

    This reduced-fat conversion clone recipe of the famous Texas-size muffins has 4 grams of fat per serving, or 8 grams total—quite a reduction compared to the original muffins, which have a total of 22 grams of fat each.

    Nutrition Facts
    Serving size–1/2 muffin
    Total servings–16
    Calories per serving–142 (Original–220)
    Fat per serving–4g (Original–11g)

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 2

    The difference between the "deluxe" version of Kraft's Macaroni & Cheese Dinner and the original is the cheese. The deluxe dinner has an envelope of cheese sauce, while the original dinner, introduced to the nation back in 1937, comes with powdered cheese. The original Kraft Macaroni & Cheese Dinner is the most popular packaged dinner product around, and one of the top six best-selling of all dry goods sold in supermarkets—probably because it only takes about 7 minutes to prepare, and a box costs just 70 cents. And who doesn't like macaroni and cheese? But it's the deluxe version—the more expensive version—with its pouch of gooey, yellow cheese sauce, that Kraft  reformulated as a reduced-fat product in 1997. The new version boasts 50 percent less fat and 10 percent fewer calories than the deluxe original, and tastes just as good. So here's a simple clone that requires you to get your hands on Cheez Whiz Light, reduced-fat Cheddar cheese, and elbow macaroni. 

    Nutrition Facts 
    Serving size–1 cup 
    Total servings–4 
    Calories per serving–290 
    Fat per serving–5g

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur. 

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    Nabisco took great effort to produce reduced-fat versions of the most popular products created by the food giant. This product loyalty-retaining move is just good business. According to one Nabisco spokesperson, "We want to bring back the people who have enjoyed our products, but went away for health and diet reasons." And that's exactly what we see happening, as customers are now grabbing the boxes with "Less Fat" printed on them. This box says, "Reduced fat: 40% less fat than original Cheese Nips."

    The secret ingredient for this clone of the popular little square crackers is the fat-free cheese sprinkles by Molly McButter. One 2-ounce shaker of the stuff will do it, and you won't use it all. Just keep in mind that cheese powder is pretty salty, so you may want to go very easy on salting the tops of the crackers 

    Nutrition Facts 
    Serving size–31 crackers 
    Total servings–about 10 
    Fat per serving–3.5g 
    Calories per serving–105

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 1

    Nabisco debuted its first six SnackWell's line of productions in 1992 to rave reviews and more than impressive sales. The company was having a hard time keeping up with the extraordinary demand, and customers would find empty shelves in the supermarkets where SnackWell's cookies were once stocked. A series of commercials addressed the supply problem with the shelf-stocking "Cookie Man" attacked by ravenous women in search of the popular products. The announcer told everyone not to worry—the products would soon be on their way.

    Today, supply has caught up with demand, and stores are able to keep plenty of these products in stock, including the bite-size chocolate chip cookies, which can be cloned with this recipe. The cookies are easily made so small by rolling the dough into long logs, which you then chill, slice, and bake. 

    Nutrition facts 
    Serving size–13 cookies 
    Total servings–11 
    Calories per serving–105 
    Fat per serving–3.3g

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    Once upon a time we drenched our salads with generous portions of popular dressings such as this one and considered it a healthy pre-entree course. Just two tablespoons of the full-fat version of Thousand Island dressing packs about 10 grams of fat, and we normally use about 1/4 cup on a salad. That's 20 grams of fat in our bellies, before the main course has even started. Today we know better. You won't get even one gram of fat from a serving of this TSR formula that clones the most popular fat-free Thousand Island dressing on the supermarket shelves. 

    Nutrition facts 
    Serving size–2 tablespoons 
    Total servings–6 
    Calories per serving–40g
    Fat per serving–0g

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Lite by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.50. Votes: 20

    Even though this stuff looks like mayonnaise, Food and Drug Administration dudes say it has to be called "dressing." Miracle Whip was invented in 1933 as a sweeter, more flavorful alternative to mayonnaise, but it contains a few extra ingredients that the FDA says aren't supposed to be in mayonnaise, such as sugar, paprika, and garlic powder. If you're a fan of Kraft's variation on the creamy white mother sauce, you must try this clone. As with homemade mayonnaise, you make a simple emulsion with egg yolk and oil. Add in the other ingredients and you've got yourself a Miracle Whip kitchen copy that's way fresher than any bottle on store shelves. 

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 5.00. Votes: 6

    Keebler joined in a federation with sixteen local and regional bakeries to help form the United Biscuit Company in 1927. This system lasted for twenty-two years, until 1949, when the conglomerate chose to operate under a single name. Keebler was judged to be the most sound and memorable. In 1983 Keebler expanded its distribution to the West Coast, making the conglomerate a national concern.

    Today Keebler manufactures more than 200 different products from its 83,000-square-foot facility in Elmhurst, Illinois. Those products, including the chewy Soft Batch cookie, are sold in some 75,000 retail outlets nationwide. Total annual sales for the company are in excess of $1.5 billion, making Keebler the second-largest cookie and cracker manufacturer in the United States, with popular products that have been enjoyed by five generations of Americans. 

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Not rated yet

    The process by which M&M/Mars and other candy companies smoothly chocolate-coat their confections is called enrobing. Enrobing was created in 1900 to protect the interiors of the bars from drying out. The process begins when the uncoated centers pass through a curtain of liquid chocolate on a continuous stainless-steel belt. The top and sides of each bar are coated with a thin layer of chocolate. The process is repeated a second time, and then the fully coated bar is quickly cooled and wrapped.

    Enrobing is the least expensive way for manufacturers to coat their chocolates. At M&M/Mars, the enrobing machines run around the clock to meet the high demand for their products. Unfortunately, traditional kitchen appliances don't include among them an enrobing machine, so in our case, dipping will have to suffice.

    The caramel Twix was introduced in 1977, and peanut butter Twix came along in 1982. 

    Source: Top Secret Recipes by Todd Wilbur.

  • Drag and drop me to the cart Product is out of stock Choose the product options first
    Coming soon...

    Score: 4.43. Votes: 7

    This Nebraska-based company grows a special kind of yellow mushroom popcorn that pops into fluffy round shapes for all its brands of candy-coated popcorn—Fiddle Faddle, Screaming Yellow Zonkers, and Poppycock—but plain microwave popcorn is all you'll need to make an easy clone. The Poppycock motto is "It's our amazing glaze!" and it is pretty amazing. The butter-toffee glaze is flavored with maple syrup, and each box is packed with lots of nuts, unlike any other glazed popcorn brands out there. Clone the Poppycock flavor you prefer: all cashews, all pecans, or a combination of almonds and pecans. Of course, you can mix in any nuts you like, salted or unsalted, as long as it comes to two cups worth for example—macadamia nuts is an great variation. You really need a candy thermometer for this recipe to get it just right, but you can also estimate temperature by drizzling some of the candy syrup into a glass of cold water once you see it begin to darken. If the candy forms brittle threads, it's ready. You coat the popcorn with the glaze by heating everything up in the microwave and stirring. There is also a technique using your oven (see Tidbits), but the microwave method is faster. 

    Source: Top Secret Recipes Unlocked by Todd Wilbur.

Items: 110 of 75, per page
What's Hot
Drop items here to shop
Product has been added to <a href="?target=cart">your cart</a>